September Forward 2021 with school and state of New Jersey

Fall 2021 Guidance for Arts Education in Changing Conditions

  • Yellow circle with sun INTRO
  • Red circle with cross in middle HEALTH & SAFETY
  • Dance icon DANCE
  • Blue circle with treble clef MUSIC
  • Burgundy circle with theater masks THEATRE
  • Orange circle with palette and paint brush VISUAL ARTS
  • Purple circle with black and white hands shaking hands CULTURAL GRPS

The impact of the pandemic had a deep and lasting effect on young people’s lives. Arts education has always helped students connect to their creativity, sense of identity, and expression of their voice. In this ever-changing time of recovery and expansion after COVID, arts education is more critical than ever. Arts education will help reconnect students to the power of learning. Arts education will provide for the much-needed social emotional learning needs that students have coming back to the school year. We have a unique opportunity to apply all that arts education offers to make a big impact on the next generation of members of this changing and growing society. 

It’s time to gather the best that arts education offers to move forward – together!

A Resource for You

In May 2020, Arts Ed NJ convened the September Ready Taskforce for Arts Education. Member organizations include: New Jersey Department of Education, New Jersey State Council on the Arts, New Jersey Education Association, New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association, New Jersey PTA, New Jersey School Boards Association, New Jersey Art Administrators Association, New Jersey Music Administrators Association, Arts Ed NJ, Art Educators of New Jersey, Dance New Jersey, New Jersey Music Educators Association, New Jersey Thespians, Speech and Theatre Association of New Jersey, Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation, Grunin Foundation, Montclair State University, Rowan University, and Young Audiences of New Jersey and Eastern Pennsylvania.

More than 100 arts administrators, educators, practitioners, and association leaders have joined together to develop the strategies, plans, and solutions needed for arts instruction to be delivered to our students in a way that addresses, first and foremost, the health, safety and well-being considerations for our students, faculty, and staff.

This group continued to meet throughout the Fall ‘20, Winter ‘21, Spring ‘21 and Summer ‘21 providing new guidance as the changing conditions and new knowledge dictated.

This document provides practical guidance for K-12 schools as administrators and arts educators seek to provide meaningful arts instruction for students of all ages and grade levels as New Jersey emerges from the COVID-19 pandemic. In this unique time, arts educators are modifying their practices not only in teaching, but in classroom orientation, cleaning, spacing, and management. It’s understood that arts educators, as trained professionals, are committed to offering the very best instruction so all students can learn and grow in their knowledge, understanding, and love of the arts. 

By maintaining access to meaningful arts learning, arts educators will continue to support the artistic, academic, social and emotional development of students, schools, and communities across New Jersey.

To that end, the most important things to bear in mind about the September Forward 2021 Guidance for Arts Education:

Caduceus

The guide does not purport to replace or contradict the guidelines issued by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the State of New Jersey, or local public health departments regarding the timing or protocols for how schools should operate in our new reality of education.

Checklist

There is no expectation that all schools and districts in New Jersey will or should follow every recommendation included here. As directed by New Jersey’s The Road Forward Restart Health and Safety Guidance for the 2021/2022 School year every district is handling the pandemic recovery process based on their own circumstances.

Alert

Reference in this report to any specific commercial product, process, or service, is for the information and convenience of the reader and does not constitute an endorsement, by Arts Ed NJ or our affiliated partners.

Keeping Arts Ed Safe at School

Keeping Arts Ed Safe in Schools

Key Principles for School Administrators

#1

Sequential Arts Education Must Return for ALL Students in ALL Instructional Models.

As defined by the New Jersey Student Learning Standards in the Visual and Performing Arts and reaffirmed with the June 2020 adoption of these standards by the New Jersey State Board of Education and outlined in the Learning Acceleration Guide, sequential arts learning aligned to standards must be maintained regardless of the instructional delivery models (in-person, hybrid, or in the event health consideration require, remote).

#2

Proper Staffing and Support Must Be Provided to Allow Continuity of Instruction Based on Health and Safety Requirements.

Arts Education programs will require the proper staffing and support to ensure continuity of instruction. This includes maintaining certified arts educators to provide sequential instruction, materials and supplies to allow for the instruction based on health and safety requirements, recommendations, and best practices.

#3

Arts Educators and Administrators Must be Included in the District Planning.

Arts educators and arts administrators have been closely reviewing and staying up to date on all of the latest research, strategies, and best practices both nationally and internationally. The collective knowledge will be a critical asset to school administrations and board members as they prepare to open schools this September.

#4

Schools Must Prioritize the Making and Creating of the Arts Together. 

While there are many aspects of arts education that have been successful in remote environments there is one very critical aspect that was not: creating dance, music, theatre or visual art together. This is what students identified as missing the most when they were suddenly out of their schools. As districts return, when the students are in school, the emphasis should be placed on creating artistic works together.

#5

Social and Emotional Learning Needs of Students, Faculty, and Staff Must be Addressed in All Aspects of Instruction. 

As outlined in the Learning Acceleration Guide, conditions for learning must address “social and emotional and environmental factors that can impact educators’ capacity to teach and students’ capacity to learn.” Arts Education plays a critical role in supporting the social and emotional needs of students. Schools should be intentional so that educators are prepared to successfully embed transformative social and emotional learning into culturally responsive instructional practices in the arts.

#6

Schools Must Address Learning Delay and Disruption in Arts Education. 

The New Jersey Department of Education’s Learning Acceleration Guide specifically identifies the need to address learning needs in all NJ Student Learning Standards content areas, including the visual and performing arts. Resources, including those available from the state and federal government (Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief Fund), should be provided to address the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the visual and performing arts.

#7

Professional Development Must be Provided. 

In order to be most effective in the new environments when our schools reopen, our educators must be afforded every opportunity, and necessary resources, to engage in professional development in relevant areas to engage in meaningful instruction.

#8

New Jersey Cultural Community Resources Should be Utilized for Instructional Support. 

New Jersey’s cultural organizations play a critical role in the education of our students. From assembly programs, field trips, artist residencies, and collaborative projects these organizations provide extended educational experiences in the arts, as well as other core content areas. As our schools reopen, they should look for appropriate opportunities for cultural organizations to continue to contribute to the educational landscape.

A Summary Overview of Arts Education Policy in New Jersey

A Constitutional Imperative

On September 19, 2019 Governor Phil Murphy announced that New Jersey had become the first state in the nation to provide universal access to arts instruction for all public-school students. This accomplishment was achieved after decades of sustained work by arts educators, arts organizations, administrators, school board members, parents, and students built on the fundamental belief in the importance of the arts as part of a well-rounded education that must be afforded to all students.

The underpinnings of this achievement are rooted in the New Jersey State Constitution.

Article VIII, Section IV, paragraph 1 states:

“The Legislature shall provide for the maintenance and support of a thorough and efficient system of free public schools for the instruction of all the children in the State between the ages of five and eighteen years.”

In May of 1997, the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled in the case of Abbott v. Burke on the two main parts of the Comprehensive Education Improvement and Financing Act (CEIFA) signed into law in December of 1996 by then Governor Whitman. CEIFA was comprised of two parts: the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards and a school funding formula. Justice Adam B. Handler, writing for the majority, upheld the previously authored New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards (now the New Jersey Student Learning Standards), commenting in his decision that they:

“are facially adequate as a reasonable legislative definition of a constitutional thorough and efficient education.” (Source: Abbott v. Burke)

It is this, and subsequent rulings by the New Jersey State Supreme Court that have codified the New Jersey Student Learning Standards, and by extension the content areas that comprise the standards, as the definition of a “thorough and efficient” education as guaranteed by the state constitution.

The 2020 New Jersey Student Learning Standards for the Visual and Performing Arts

On June 3, 2020, the New Jersey State Board of Education adopted the 2020 New Jersey Student Learning Standards for the Visual and Performing Arts (NJSLS) identifies essential core learning in the arts, defined as dance, music, theater, visual art and media arts. The NJSLS states:

All students will have equitable access to a quality, arts education that leads to artistic literacy and fluency in the artistic practices of the five art disciplines as a mechanism for:

  1. Performing, presenting or producing, as artistically literate individuals, by expressing and realizing creative ideas and implementing essential technical skills and cognitive abilities significant to many aspects of life and work in the 21st century;
  2. Responding to artistic ideas and work with personal meaning and cognizance of the ability of the arts to address universal themes, including climate change;
  3. Creating new artistic work reflective of a variety of ethnic, racial, and cultural perspectives; and
  4. Connecting and evaluating how the arts convey meaning through all arts and non-arts disciplines and contexts of our global society.

The New Jersey Student Learning Standards for Visual and Performing Arts (NJSLS-VPA) describe the expectations for literacy and fluency in five artistic disciplines: dance, music, theatre, visual arts, and media arts. Each artistic discipline has independent skills, knowledge, and content. However, as a field, the arts are interdependent, connected, and inclusive. The NJSLSVPA are designed to guide the delivery of arts education in the classroom with new ways of thinking, learning, and creating. Equitable access to a quality arts education is only achieved when the five arts disciplines are offered continuously throughout the K–12 spectrum.

This means the arts programs must have the same level of academic rigor and educational validity as any other core subject such as language arts literacy or math.

The standards further define learning expectations by grade band. The NJSLS-VPA were created to ensure that all students are able to:

  1. Communicate with basic literacy in each of the five arts disciplines by the end of grade 5 by using the vocabulary, materials, tools, techniques, and intellectual methods of each arts discipline in a developmentally appropriate manner.
  2. Beginning in grade 6, student learning in the arts is driven by specialization, with students choosing one of the five arts disciplines based on interest, aptitudes, and career aspirations. By the end of grade 8, students are expected to communicate with competency in their self-selected arts discipline.
  3. By the end of grade 12, students are expected to communicate with proficiency in one or more arts disciplines of their choice.

By graduation from high school, all students shall, in at least one area of specialization, be able to:

  1. Respond to works of art with insight and depth of understanding, calling upon informed acquaintance with exemplary works of art from a variety of cultures and historical periods.
  2. Develop and present basic analyses of works of art from structural, historical, cultural, and aesthetic perspectives, pointing to their impact on contemporary modes of expression.
  3. Perform/present/produce in a self-selected arts discipline with consistency, artistic nuance, and technical ability, defining and solving artistic problems with insight, reason, and technical proficiency.
  4. Relate various types of arts knowledge and skills within and across arts disciplines, by mixing and matching competencies and understandings in artmaking, history, culture, and analysis in any arts-related project.

School districts have until September 2022 to update and align local arts education curricula to the new Visual and Performing Arts Standards

High School Graduation Requirements in the Arts

The New Jersey Administrative Code requires that, in order to successfully complete high school, students must meet the state’s Graduation Requirements, including 5 credits (1 year) in Visual & Performing Arts for High School graduation effective with the 2004-2005 ninth grade class (graduating class of 2008).

Social and Emotional Learning and Arts Education

“I believe everyone will soon come to realize that our arts educators are the secret weapon to implementation of Social Emotional Learning in our schools.” – Dr. Maurice Elias

As noted in the New Jersey Department of Education’s Learning Acceleration Guide:

The NJDOE recognizes that addressing student learning and social emotional needs in strategic and constructive ways is essential to both the short-term response to the current pandemic and our long-term commitment to educational equity and excellence.

Social Emotional Learning (SEL) was around before the COVID-19 pandemic and will be around long after; however, the common trauma we are all experiencing has put a magnifying glass on the necessity for schools to help students survive and thrive when confronted with profound challenges. Therefore, the social and emotional well-being of educators, staff, and students must be a central consideration within the reopening plans of schools throughout New Jersey. The singular priority of schools as they seek strategies to navigate the pandemic is student and staff safety–physically, mentally, socially, and emotionally. Our students cannot learn until they feel safe.

SEL is a competency-based approach that can help achieve that safety by building students’ self-awareness, self-management, social-awareness, relationship management, and responsible decision-making skills (simplified to the three goals of SELF, OTHERS, DECISIONS). It is through SEL that students develop the skills to respond to challenges. It is essential that arts educators fully leverage the connections between SEL and the arts. Our students need SEL and arts education now more than ever!

The Collaborative for Academic and Social Emotional Learning (CASEL) has included a useful checklist in An Initial Guide to Leveraging the Power of Social and Emotional Learning As You Prepare to Reopen and Renew Your School Community to assist leaders as they consider the practical ways to operationalize and integrate SEL into transition plans. Arts educators have a unique opportunity to engage students in transformative SEL (anchored in the notion of justice-oriented citizenship, with issues of culture, identity, agency, belonging, and engagement explored as relevant expressions of the five core SEL competencies) a framework that is being developed by CASEL, to advance “SEL as a Lever for Equity”. An equally important resource for arts educators and administrators is the Arts Education and Social and Emotional Learning Framework, which is designed to support two primary goals:

  1. Empowering arts educators with the information they need to revise curricula and instruction to embed the activation of the SEL components into practice.

  2. Providing arts educators, administrators, and other decision-makers with the information needed to elevate the understanding of how arts education is a valuable tool to support the implementation of SEL strategies in a school or district.

As arts educators prepare to make instructional choices that will support the social and emotional needs of students, it will be paramount that they invoke the philosophical foundation, common language, essential questions, and enduring understandings articulated throughout the Arts Education and Social and Emotional Learning Framework. SEL is not a box to be checked or another item for educators to squeeze into instructional time with students. When done well, transformative SEL through arts education bears the indicators of great teaching. For SEL to be effective in teaching students the life skills needed to navigate their world after they leave the arts classroom, it must be embedded into curricular content as embodied by dance, music, theatre and visual art.

Compelling rationale for arts education utilizing SEL are:

  • Purposeful integration of SEL into arts education will enrich the students’ personal connection to the arts.

  • The relationship built between arts teachers and students over multiple years of instruction fosters the caring environment necessary to help build school connectedness and foster empathy.

  • The perseverance needed to dedicate oneself to artistic excellence fosters resiliency both in and out of the arts classroom.

  • Artistic creation fosters self-awareness and allows students to develop a greater sense of autonomy and emotional vocabulary.

  • The collaborative community developed in the arts classroom welcomes discussions and an awareness of acceptance and embracing diversity.

  • Through the arts students learn the necessity of personal goal-setting, self-assessment, and accountability as they develop high standards for their artist endeavors and themselves.

  • Arts education provides developmental experiences that actively allow students to practice and hone social emotional competencies.

The NJDOE understands the important role of climate and culture, more specifically, social and emotional learning (SEL) and how critical it is in re-engaging students, supporting adults, rebuilding relationships, and creating a foundation for academic learning.

For additional tool and resources visit the Center for Social Emotional Learning and Arts Education at: ArtsEdSEL.org

Information from this section has been derived from the Arts Education & Social and Emotional Framework (Arts Ed NJ), Advocating for Music Education Utilizing Social Emotional Learning (Scott Edgar, Bob Morrison) and the Collaborative for Academic and Social Emotional Learning (CASEL).

Statement of Principles

In September of 2017, New Jersey’s leading education associations came together to endorse a statement of principles regarding the importance and value of arts education. The eight principles are:

First, every student in New Jersey should have a comprehensive education in the arts.

Second, to ensure a basic education in the arts for all students, the arts should remain recognized as serious, core academic subjects.

Third, as education policy makers develop decisions, they should incorporate the multiple lessons of recent research concerning the value and positive impact of arts education.

Fourth, qualified arts teachers and sequential curriculum must be recognized as the basis and core for substantive arts education for all students.

Fifth, arts education programs grounded in rigorous instruction, provide meaningful assessment of academic progress and performance, and take their place within a structure of direct accountability to school officials, parents, and the community.

Sixth, community arts providers that offer exposure to, and enrichment through the arts in both in-school and out-of-school settings give valuable support and enhancement to an in-school arts education.

Seventh, integrating the arts into other curricular areas, when done properly, enlivens learning for our students. Arts integration should be coordinated between the arts educators and the other content specialists and/or community partners to ensure learning outcomes in all content areas are met. However, arts integration, while a valuable tool for learning, is not a substitute for the acquisition of skills and knowledge provided by in-school arts education programs.

Eighth and finally, we offer our unified support to those programs, policies, and practitioners that reflect these principles.


This document was signed by New Jersey Association of School Administrators, New Jersey Education Association, New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association, New Jersey PTA, New Jersey School Boards Association, and Arts Ed NJ.

Download a copy of this Statement of Principles

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Health & Safety Header

Current Health and Safety Guidance for Arts Education

Updated as of December 4, 2021

The following applies to indoor visual performing arts classrooms and activities (Dance, Music, Theatre, Visual Art):

As the New Jersey and the United States continue the process of moving to post-pandemic conditions, questions about visual and performing arts activities abound. Many questions still exist for the beginning of the 2021-2022 school year. Although the New Jersey is reaching a higher level of vaccinated adults, the vaccination rates for those ages 12-17 remains lower and students under the age of 12 do not have any access to vaccinations. Importance will need to be placed on local respiratory disease transmission rates for use of mitigations. Depending on developments with respect to variants such as the Delta variant and other potential risk factor enhancements, this guidance is meant to provide some best practices for arts education as New Jersey emerges from the pandemic.

On August 6, 2021 Governor Murphy announced the signing of Executive Order 251 which requires that “all students, educators, staff, and visitors will be required to wear face masks indoors for the start of the 2021-2022 school year.” The Executive Order (EO) 251, which will mandate masking in the indoor premises of all public, private, and parochial preschool, elementary, and secondary school buildings, with limited exceptions. The EO is effective on Monday, August 9, 2021. 

Regardless of local conditions, proper hygiene and ventilation strategies should be a priority for all schools at all times. 

The Arts Ed NJ Guidance has been developed based on the policies, guidance, research and recommendations available as of this date. As conditions change this guidance will be updated to reflect current state executive orders and agency recommendations .

Outdoors

Outdoors (All ages): There are no mask, distancing, or time limitations for any outdoor visual and performing arts activity. Outdoors remain the safest space. No mitigations are needed (subject to level of local transmission rates). Proper hygiene strategies should remain in place.

In Schools

The following applies to indoor visual performing arts classrooms and activities (Dance, Media Arts, Music, Theatre, Visual Art):

Mask

Masks: Masks (made of appropriate material*) should be utilized by all performers except wind players where the instrument itself should be masked. Wind Players may have a normal mask around the neck when playing the instrument which should be used to cover the mouth when not playing. Specially designed player masks are not necessary. 

NOTE: Flutes and Recorders do not need any covering as they do not generate aerosols.

Timing: In spaces with good ventilation, indoor rehearsal time should be limited to 50 minutes** followed by one air exchange before resuming (A minimum of 3 air changes per hour should be used or 1 air change every 20 minutes). If there are spaces with higher air change rates, you may consider longer rehearsal times.

Social Distancing: Distancing of three feet (measured center of seat to center of seat) is suggested when feasible but should not preclude an activity from taking place. A properly ventilated space should be used. Proper hygiene strategies should remain in place.

Proper hygiene and ventilation strategies should be a priority at all times. 

*Material should consist of MERV13 material or ASTM F2100 (or similar) standard.

** For classes over 50 minutes start and end the class with a non-performance activity

NOTE: Mitigation strategies for timing and social distancing should be implemented “when feasible” and should not be used as an excuse to preclude any activity from taking place.

Note on Face Shields and Partitions: Plastic face shields do not stop aerosol, masks do; room dividers inhibit the function of the HVAC system and are not recommended.

Indoor Performances

Currently there are no prohibitions on indoor performances for schools. During the spring of 2021 indoor scholastic performances followed the Executive Orders for performing arts venues across the state. Using New Jersey performing arts venues as a model informs the approach to considerations for scholastic performances.


Audience Considerations

Audience Mitigation: Masks are required at all times for everyone (staff, visitors, students) while on school property regardless of day or time (Executive Order 251). It is strongly recommended to avoid providing food and drink for the performance/exhibition.

Audience Size: There are currently no audience limitations in effect in New Jersey. Local school districts may impose their own restrictions for physical distancing.

Physical (Social) Distancing: Physical distancing should be followed in the lobby, bathrooms, auditorium and all indoor spaces, 6 feet where feasible. Consider additional performances with smaller audiences to allow for more physical distancing.

Vaccination Status: Most New Jersey Performing Arts Venues currently require proof of vaccination to attend indoor performances. This does NOT apply to scholastic performances.

Health Screening: All audience members should conduct a health screening prior to arriving at the school performance using the CDC Symptoms Self-Checking Tool: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html#

If an audience member is unwell, they should stay home.

Traffic: It is highly recommended to create an even flow of audience members coming in and out of performance spaces. Establish a separate entrance and exit to allow for one-way traffic.
Reduced Contact: Strategies should be considered to reduce contact between individuals. This includes ticketing, programs, concessions and other interactions.


Performer/Performance Considerations:

Masks: Masks should be worn at all times by all staff, volunteers and crew. Performers should wear a mask at all times with the following exceptions:

  • Wind Instrumentalists: Wind players may remove their mask while performing. Once a performance has concluded the mask should be returned to cover the face (E.O. 251).
  • Wind Instruments: Wind instruments should be masked with bell covers at all times.
  • Vocal Performers: Masks should be worn at all times by vocal performers. Microphones should be used where feasible.
  • Actors/Theatrical Performers: Masks should be worn at all times by actors and theatrical performers (E.O. 251). Microphones should be used where feasible.
  • Dancers: Masks should be worn at all times unless the dancer is “engaged in high-intensity aerobic or anaerobic activity” as outlined in E.O. 251. In this instance the mask may be removed for performance and should be returned once a performance segment concludes.

Screening Testing: Screening testing* is also an effective strategy, adding another layer of prevention in combination with other mitigation strategies. Screening testing should be considered where feasible.

Physical (Social) Distancing: Performers should be spaced out at 3 feet (center of seat to center of seat) where feasible and further if space allows. If maintaining physical districing of 3 feet is not feasible, other mitigation (masking, time limitations) should be strictly followed. Encourage physical distancing between individual performers (singers and musicians, teacher and student), and also between performers and audience members.

Health Screening: All performers, faculty, and staff should conduct a health screening prior to arriving at the school performance using the CDC Symptoms Self-Checking Tool: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html#

If a performer/faculty/staff member is unwell, they should stay home.

Time: Performances should be limited in duration based on the ventilation and size of the space. Performances held in smaller classroom settings should be no longer than 50 minutes. Performances in larger spaces (multi-purpose rooms and auditoriums) may increase the performance time with good ventilation.**

Intermission: When feasible, performance should not include an intermission. For theatrical performance that includes intermission, spaces should be set up to allow audience members to socially distance themselves.

Hygiene: Proper hygiene strategies for audience members and performers should be followed at all times.

Equipment: Avoid shared equipment where the mouth may come into contact with equipment (such as mouthpieces, microphones, etc.) and follow manufacturer’s instructions to clean thoroughly between uses. Consider disposable microphone covers. Use proper cleaning strategies to wipe down dressing rooms, microphones (if used), props, set pieces, instruments, costumes, wigs.

* Screening Testing
The CDC suggests screening testing as a potential strategy for groups mixing vaccinated and unvaccinated students:
“To facilitate safe participation in sports, extracurricular activities, and other activities with elevated risk (such as activities that involve singing, shouting, band, and exercise that could lead to increased exhalation), schools may consider implementing screening testing for participants who are not fully vaccinated. Schools can routinely test student athletes, participants, coaches, and trainers, and other people (such as adult volunteers) who are not fully vaccinated and could come into close contact with others during these activities. Schools can implement screening testing of participants who are not fully vaccinated up to 24 hours before sporting, competition, or extracurricular events.”

** There is no time limitation for facilities with an air flow rate of at least 52 cubic feet per minute per person


Resources for Indoor Performances:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/schools-childcare/k-12-guidance.html

New Jersey Executive Order 251
https://nj.gov/infobank/eo/056murphy/pdf/EO-251.pdf

New Jersey Department of Health COVID-19 Information for Schools
https://www.state.nj.us/health/cd/topics/covid2019_schools.shtml

International Coalition of Performing Arts Coalition Aerosol Study
https://www.nfhs.org/articles/unprecedented-international-coalition-led-by-performing-arts-organizations-to-commission-covid-19-study/

Arts Ed NJ September Forward Fall 2021 Guidance for Arts Education
https://www.artsednj.org/september-forward/

Keeping Arts Ed Safe in School

Keeping Arts Ed Safe in Schools

Screening Testing

The CDC suggests screening testing as a potential strategy for groups mixing vaccinated and unvaccinated students:

To facilitate safe participation in sports, extracurricular activities, and other activities with elevated risk (such as activities that involve singing, shouting, band, and exercise that could lead to increased exhalation), schools may consider implementing screening testing for participants who are not fully vaccinated. Schools can routinely test student athletes, participants, coaches, and trainers, and other people (such as adult volunteers) who are not fully vaccinated and could come into close contact with others during these activities. Schools can implement screening testing of participants who are not fully vaccinated up to 24 hours before sporting, competition, or extracurricular events.

Recommendations are based on:

Coalition of Performing Arts Aerosol Study (July 9, 2021 Update): Dr. Shelly Miller, University of Colorado Boulder and Dr. Jelena Srebric, University of Maryland, Lead Researchers https://www.nfhs.org/articles/unprecedented-international-coalition-led-by-performing-arts-organizations-to-commission-covid-19-study/

Current CDC Guidance (https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/schools-childcare/k-12-guidance.html )

United States Department of Education Return to School Roadmap

New Jersey Department of Health and New Jersey Department of Education:

The Road Forward Health and Safety Guidance for the 2021-2022 School Year https://www.nj.gov/education/roadforward/docs/HealthAndSafetyGuidanceSY2122.pdf

New Jersey Department of Education: The Road Forward, Engage, Recover, and Reimagine Education in New Jersey https://www.nj.gov/education/roadforward/

For more detailed information on this and other visual and performing arts guidance, please visit https://www.artsednj.org/september-forward/

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Dance Education Considerations for School Reopening 2021-2022

As part of the blueprint to return to the school environment, a dance classroom led by a certified PreK-12 dance educator is a space that will empower all students to engage, refresh, and develop social, emotional, intellectual, expressive, and creative thinking skills. Certified dance educators are prepared to return to a fully functioning dance classroom in order to enable a versatile and empowering dance curriculum to support students’ mental, physical and emotional needs provoked by the pandemic. It is essential to preserve access to and funding for dance classes and dance programs within the daily schedule of PreK-12 settings, as well as an increase in offering, in order to nurture a positive learning environment where students are given the opportunity to express, move, create and connect to the self and the community. Dance education can help build self-esteem and a positive body image; promote responsibility; navigate self-discovery; develop self-management skills; teach and engage collaboration; bolster creative thinking; strengthen decision making; encourage risk taking; and praise diversity. A well-rounded dance curriculum that spans the grade levels of PreK-12 facilitated by certified dance educators provides students the means to become self advocates, creative thinkers, and leaders. 

The Value of Technology in the Classroom

There were many discoveries the virtual learning environment unveiled as positive extensions for the in-person dance classroom that heightened the quality and experience of the dance education curriculum. Virtual platforms that enable video submission, video sharing, and online student feedback extend the walls of the dance classroom beyond the dedicated class time. Virtual classroom platforms allow assignments, archives of class learning experiences, and visual lesson supports to be readily available and accessible for all learners. Funding and continued efforts for equity in technology access is highly encouraged to create tech-savvy dance classrooms in order to continue to enhance the impact of dance learning and increase the accessibility to all learners.

Considerations for Transitioning Back to the Dance Classroom

Beyond building upon pre-existing knowledge of seasonal learning disruptions as a guide, consider the following factors as likely influencers on students and school communities while transitioning back into the dance classroom. (Returning to the Classroom After COVID-19 Shutdowns: What to Expect and How to Be Prepared)

#1

Trauma: For some students, sudden school closures occurred alongside other potentially traumatic events, including family income and job losses, health crises, and a high overall level of disruption.

#2

Loss of enrichment opportunities: Students following stay-at-home directives are unable to access enrichment opportunities such as field trips and face-to-face tutoring sessions.

#3

Reduced access to educational resources: For families focused on survival during the shutdown period, concerns about housing, food, healthcare, and jobs may take priority over student learning.

As the state dance organization and state affiliate for the National Dance Education Organization, Dance New Jersey advocates for the inclusion of dance in all New Jersey public and private PreK-12 schools and supports dance educators across multiple environments (i.e. studios, colleges/universities, community centers, etc.) with professional development and networking. For more information on the impact of dance education visit www.ndeo.org/evidence to review the following documents: “Stand Up for Dance in America’s K-12 Schools” brochure and Evidence: A Report on the Impact of Dance in the K-12 Setting.

To connect to continued advocacy efforts for Arts Education, go to Arts Are Education 

School Reopening 2021-2022 vs. 2020-2021 Guidance

Focused on returning to the dance classroom, guidance for school reopening 2021-2022 includes the following additional information. 

  • Facilities update based on CDC and NJDOH
  • Tech savvy dance classroom examples
  • Information about returning to more intense levels of physical activity
  • Performance guidance
  • New technology platforms to extend and support the impact of the dance classroom

For guidance for remote learning, refer to September Ready Guidelines for School Reopening 2020-2021.

Scheduling, Facilities, & Social Distancing Recommendations

Facilities

The dance classroom may return to a fully functioning movement and creative environment with the maximum number of students permitted in the space and without restriction as per local and NJDOE guidance. Due to continued updating on state and federal levels, it is recommended to check the current guidelines from the CDC, state, and local agencies for mask requirements and social distancing. 

The following recommendations address the dance classroom with implementation of social distancing and mask mandates to support continuity of the dance curriculum and viability of dance programs.

  1. When feasible, tape the floor into 3×3 to 6×6 personal squares with a clear ‘path’ from the doorway to each square. The CDC recommends that all students, regardless of age, maintain a distance of at least 6 feet when increased exhalation occurs, including exercise and sports. Yet, the social distancing requirement should not hinder the offering of and participation in Dance. Review the current social distancing CDC guidelines for up-to-date appropriate measures for social distancing.
  2. Designate specific procedures within the classroom to assign how students move to their spot and enter and exit the classroom while socially distanced. Maintaining procedures and records, including assigned spots on the barre or in the center floor, are useful for contact tracing procedures.  
  3. Add markings on the floor, possibly around the perimeter of the room, for student belongings, books, shoes, etc. 
  4. Remove unnecessary items, such as furniture, area rugs, mirror coverings, and theatre fabrics (curtains, legs, etc.), from studios and other shared spaces.
  5. Keep each student’s belongings in an assigned, separate, safe and clean space such as individually labeled cubbies, lockers, or areas. 
  6. When feasible, mark spots at the ballet barres to adhere to social distancing guidelines in all directions. 
    1. Use free-standing barres when possible, or tape off 3 feet to 6 feet of distance on installed barres in the studio/theater.
  7. If necessary, due to scheduling and physical space limitations, develop a clear schedule that allows some dancers to engage in self-paced, stationary, socially distanced learning activities around the perimeter or in one section of the room while others are dancing in their designated spaces.
  8. Larger spaces may be provided for larger groups. Consider the auditorium, gymnasium, cafeteria, outdoor space and adapt movement activities to suit the environmental needs and ensure safety of all students.
  9. The dance studio space should not be used for other purposes throughout the school day in order to protect the cleanliness of the space, for the safety of the students, and to be able to provide rigorous, standards-based dance instruction.
  10. Windows and doors should remain open when possible in order to provide ventilation. The A/C should be on if available. Consider installing HEPA air filters and purifiers to maintain safe air flow, especially in studios with air conditioning. Refer to CDC Ventilation in Buildings: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/ventilation.html#daf
  11. Frequently used equipment must be sanitized after each use. Equipment includes, but not limited to, barres, dance floor, sound systems, mats, media/live-stream equipment, chairs, tables, props, musical instruments, microphones, cubbies/lockers, etc.
    1. Suggested CDC floor cleaners approved to kill COVID-19 include the following:
      1. Harlequin approved disinfectant (Marley) (EPA# 10324-167)
      2. Stage Step: ProClean D Plus (Marley) (EPA#1839-95)
      3. BONA: STA Disinfecting Cleaner (Wood) (EPA# 91861-2)

Classroom Setup: Tech Savvy Suggested Hardware

The following list of hardware was compiled from suggestions of dance educators who have worked in in-person/hybrid settings. It is recommended to continue to implement a tech-savvy dance classroom due to the increased accessibility of learning and impact of the dance curriculum.

N Visual
  • Additional screen: one as the teaching source and the other to monitor student view
  • Camera (video and/or still): for class work documentation, performances, promotional recording and stills, assessment, creation of video libraries, etc.
  • Tripod
  • Document camera: a modernized overhead projector that enhances lesson delivery and virtual learning  
  • Projector and screen or mounted TV screen: enables to see virtual students on a large screen, as well as show digital presentations
  • Webcam: an additional webcam to the one included in your computer allows better quality visuals for your students.
  • Wide angle lens: clip-on wide angle lenses change the narrow view of an iPhone, iPad, smartphone or laptop camera into a wide view
O Audio
  • Headset
  • Portable Speaker
  • Wireless Headphones
~ Connectivity
  • Ethernet adapter
  • HDMI cords
  • HDMI switcher: allows you to connect two different HDMI-compatible devices or consoles to the same port on the TV or monitor
  • Splitter docking station: docking stations include some combination of extra USB ports, audio jacks, an Ethernet jack, SD card slots, and one or more display ports (HDMI, DisplayPort, VGA, DVI, etc.). Allows for splitting the computer display onto multiple screens.
  • External hard drive
Examples of Classroom Setup with technology and social distancing

The images provided are samples to serve as a catalyst for ideas to arrange technology for a tech-savvy dance classroom and to manage classroom organization in the event of social distancing requirements.

Tech set up for dance class
Photo Credit: Claudine Ranieri, Paramus High School
Dance class tech set up 2
Photo Credit: Emily Donahue, Cranford High School
Dance Classroom set up
Photo Credit: Marissa Stahl, Gloucester County Institute of Technology
Dance classroom set up
Photo Credit: Elizabeth Zwierzynski, Trenton Central High School

Dress Code

In the event of fully functioning dance classrooms, dress code requirements may return to normal as indicated by dance educators. 

Recommendations below are provided in the event of alternate scenarios such as social distancing and mask mandates.

  1. Educators should advise and adapt program/class dress code policies to new learning scenarios.
  2. If students are not changing for class, consider encouraging students to wear clothing that allows for full movement and is safe for participation.
  3. If applicable, educators are encouraged to create a procedure for locker or changing rooms to accommodate social distancing guidelines. Sourced from the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association:
    1. Locker room use is limited to changing, storage, hand washing, and restroom use only.
    2. Minimize the amount of time spent in the locker room.
    3. Social distancing and face coverings are recommended for all staff and students while inside the locker room unless it would inhibit the individual’s health.
    4. All areas must be cleaned and sanitized in accordance with CDC and EPA guidelines.
    5. Schools must ensure indoor facilities have adequate ventilation, must prepare, and maintain hand sanitizing stations, and must ensure that students wash hands frequently.
  4. Follow CDC, state, and district guidelines for wearing masks.
    1. As the mask may become sweaty in dance class, provide or advise students to have a second mask to wear after dance. Dance/USA COVID-19 FAQ for dancers and dance companies returning to the studios has considerations for dancers wearing masks.
    2. Determine appropriate masks for dance/physical activity. The most effective fabrics for cloth masks are tightly woven such as cotton and cotton blends, breathable, and in two or three fabric layers. Masks with exhalation valves or vents, those that use loosely woven fabrics, and ones that do not fit properly are not recommended.
      1. Masks should be washed after every use and/or before being used  again, or if visibly soiled or damp/wet. 
      2. Disposable face masks should be changed daily or when visibly soiled, damp or damaged. 
      3. Students and schools should have additional disposable or cloth masks available for students, teachers, and staff in case a back-up mask is needed (e.g. mask is soiled or lost during the day).
    3. Consult with school nurses and medical professionals about students with specific respiratory conditions (e.g. asthma).
  5. No street shoes or outside shoes allowed on the dance floor under any circumstance.
  6. Genre/style specific footwear should be worn and is dependent on the class being taught.
  7. Students are encouraged to bring their own water bottle. Water bottles must not be shared. Hydration stations should not be utilized.

Section Resources

Instructional Strategies

Recommendations and resources are provided for best practices in lesson planning and delivery for transitioning back into the dance classroom with consideration for student needs and populations. 

In-Person Learning

l Level of Dance Activity

Sourced from AGMA & SDC Return to Stage and Performing Arts Playbook

In order to best support dancers, any reopening plan should be designed to allow the dancers to get back into the studios incrementally, build on the limited and virtual class and conditioning activities they have been doing at home, and provide adequate time (up to six weeks) prior to return to be “performance ready.” The following are general principles for reconditioning following injury or a break from training:

  • Start at a fraction of the full workload (e.g., 50%)
  • Build up gradually (i.e., do not increase volume or intensity of activity by more than 10-20% per week).
  • Modify activity level and pace of increase based on symptoms (i.e., increase at a slower pace if there is evidence of injury, excessive fatigue, or physical or mental breakdown).
  • Restore general fitness before attempting ballet-specific or sport-specific activities.
  • Space out workouts and maintain variety as much as possible (i.e., do not concentrate too much of the same activity within a short timeframe and try to space out “like” forms of exercise [e.g., legs, core, aerobic, high intensity, plyometrics] throughout the week).
l In the event of mask mandates:
  • Intensity of class should be monitored and adjusted as dancers get used to wearing masks. Avoid exercises with large, dynamic movements. Body will adapt to wearing masks after a few weeks. Dance USA COVID FAQ – MAY 2020
  • Educators should use a microphone and speaker when delivering instruction to students. The use of face coverings and the need for students to spread out to accommodate physical distancing may make it more difficult for educator instructions to be heard. https://www.shapeamerica.org//advocacy/K-12_School_Re-entry_Considerations.aspx
l  In the event of social distancing mandates and/or local transmission data:
  • Limit activities in lessons that involve physical touch.
  • Educators will not provide tactile touch or feedback.
  • Center Work: In the event of social distancing mandate, dancers should be able to maintain a minimum of 6 feet distance. Normal breathing should be encouraged rather than cued inhaling and exhaling.
  • Across the Floor: Traveling across the floor side by side while maintaining 6 feet distance is recommended. One group should complete the exercise across the entire room before the next group begins.

Hybrid Learning

Educators will plan according to the adapted schedule allowing for the best use of in-person time and remote time. This will require educators to utilize and adapt their curriculum according to best practices in terms of both health and safety, and curriculum and instruction. (Blended Learning Universe)

l  To balance the blend of in-person learning and remote learning, the educator may design learning experiences that are engaging and equitable. 

(5 Keys to Success in Hybrid Learning)

  • Consider the use of asynchronous work as a way for students to explore their own creativity away from the screen
  • Consider various modalities for them to present/document their learning.
  • To utilize in-person instruction, educators may use virtual learning to develop and teach basic phrase-work for class (e.g. a warmup involving body isolations) so that when in class, students can focus on technical aspects and not sequence.
  • The educator may record lessons in the studio teaching technique and choreography for the students to work on at home. The educator can utilize this method for differentiated instruction as well, in particular with students who may need additional technique feedback or are ready for more challenging technical material.
l Windows and doors should remain open if possible to provide ventilation. 
The A/C should be on if available. If a classroom does not have A/C, the educator may opt to use the in-person time to work through project-based learning that does not include high levels of physical exertion

Instructional Resources

For resources to support the listed topics, reference Expanded Instructional Strategies.

  • Social Emotional Learning (SEL)
  • Considerations for Students with Disabilities
  • Considerations for Emerging Bilinguals (EBs)
  • Considerations for Culturally Relevant Pedagogy
  • Considerations for LGBTQ+ Community
  • Considerations for Collaborations

Summer Programming

To support the transition back into the dance classroom for student and program benefit, building a summer program may help in easing the students’ and educators’ physical, mental and emotional well-being as the new school year approaches. Below are themes and ideas for summer dance programs.

  • Dance and conditioning
  • Somatic Practices
  • Creative Movement 
  • Improvisation and Choreography
  • Celebrating the Individual through Dance
  • Building community through Dance
  • Exploring movement through games
  • Specific movement practices

Performances

In order to meet the “Performing” state standards (NJ Student Learning Standards: Visual and Performing Arts; National Core Arts Standards), performances are an essential experience for students to share their artistry and skill. Performances may resume as appropriately according to current state and federal guidance from the CDC, state, and local agencies. 

l Detailed guidance for production of performances:
l When planning for performances, consider the following when social distancing and mask mandates are in place.
  • Cast small groups and double cast if possible. 
  • Keep in-person rehearsal periods shorter than usual.
  • Individuals should wear masks during dance activity of any kind—performances (inclusive of any group activity with an audience like fully produced shows, informal shows, open rehearsals, practice sessions, dance battles, dance jams, etc.) classes, and rehearsals. When wearing masks interferes with necessary aspects such as hair, makeup, or wardrobe, performers may temporarily remove masks and should don them as soon as possible. (Reopening Dance in NYC)
  • It is recommended to allocate 150 square feet per dancer for movement and exertion. (AGMA/SDC guidelines)
  • Choreography should limit partnering and physical touch, or exclude if covid transmission is high in the local area.
  • Collaborative performances and opportunities are possible with virtual performances.
  • Opportunities to continue guest artist and guest choreographer enrichment experiences can result in performances.
  • Outdoor, site-specific performances can be filmed in advance.

Assessment

When schools reopen for in-person instruction, students will return with very different levels of knowledge and skills, with disadvantaged students most likely to exhibit the greatest learning losses. The key to learning recovery in this context is the alignment of instruction and additional supports to where students are in their learning trajectory. Learning assessment – the process of gathering and evaluating information on what students know, understand, and can do – is an essential ingredient in this process of evaluating the state of a student’s learning and in supporting learning recovery and advancement towards learning goals. As such, learning assessment should be a key element of any policy package supporting school reopening, as it puts the focus back on learning. (Learning in the time of COVID-19: the role of learning assessment in reopening schools)

For further recommendations for Formative and Summative Assessment, reference Expanded Instructional Strategies. 

Section Resources

Equipment, Materials, & Supplies

Attention to equipment, materials, and supplies in the dance classroom is required to adhere to CDC, state, and district safety guidelines. The following are considerations for safe handling to mitigate any possible spread.

In-Person Learning

l It is recommended that schools are equipped with the following cleaning supplies:
  • Disposable gloves for cleaning equipment based on the CDC recommendation when cleaning and disinfecting.
  • Sanitizers, wipes, and paper towels that are easily accessible for staff and students.
  • Dance floor cleaner/disinfectant. CDC floor cleaners approved to kill COVID-19 include the following:
    • Harlequin approved disinfectant (Marley) (EPA# 10324-167)
    • Stage Step: ProClean D Plus (Marley) (EPA#1839-95)
    • BONA: STA Disinfecting Cleaner (Wood) (EPA# 91861-2)
  • Electronic screen cleaners
l In the event of social distancing mandates: 
  • Visual signage and verbal reminders for social distancing and masks.
  • Floor markings to outline the recommended distance for people to occupy.
    • Spike tape, gaff tape or painters tape work well when creating floor markings.
  • Designated and labeled places to store any belongings/water bottles.
l Teachers should use voice amplification technology and/or microphones to reduce vocal effort (less droplet spread).
 
l Students with disabilities should be supplied with their own tactile aides. (ex. manipulatives and floor spots)
 
l Elementary students should be supplied with their own tactile aides to avoid sharing.
  • Tactile aides should be made of materials that are easily cleaned/disinfected and should be disinfected before and after each use.
  • If tactile aides are made from fabric such as scarves, options to launder/disinfect these need to be provided as well.
l Staff should be properly trained on how to safely apply disinfectant and have access to the appropriate personal protective equipment needed. 

Ensure sufficient ventilation when applying disinfectants. Follow the directions listed on the disinfectant label. Make sure disinfectants are stored appropriately and out of reach of students. Always consult with the school-wide COVID-19 response team before creating a plan for sanitizing equipment.

Hybrid Learning

l Create a safe movement environment at home for both teacher and students. 
  • Designate a dedicated dance space with safe flooring (e.g. Wood, thin carpet).
  • Encourage warm room temperature to avoid injury.
  • Provide students with dress guidelines for both in-person and remote learning.
  • If applicable, identify barre substitutes at home (e.g. heavy chair, countertop, solid table at appropriate height).
  • Encourage students to use a sheet, blanket, drapes, or large material as a decorative background
l Provide students with two sets of any tactile aides if used, one set to remain at home and one set to remain at school to diminish transport of potential virus particles.
 
l Students need to have access to or be provided with appropriate technology equipment (device with a camera and internet access) and software to complete assignments.
 
l To support a tech savvy dance classroom, the educator will need a reliable camera and backup camera provided by the school district. This will allow the students in the classroom and at home to have a clear picture of the teacher and to follow the lesson being taught.
 
l Parental consent forms should be completed allowing for use of video software.

Section Resources

Technology Considerations

Technology has proven to be an impactful teaching tool within the dance classroom becoming a key part of instructional practices. Below are technology learning platforms and best practices for in-school and hybrid learning environments.

Technology Access Considerations

l By the beginning of the school year, all students should have the device and connectivity they need to access continued learning online, particularly among low-income and rural students. (A-BluePrint For Back To School, AEI)

l Schools need to have devices and mobile hotspots for students to take home in the event of remote learning. Schools also need to consider ways of providing technical support in remote learning contexts, including providing on-demand support for educators.

l All apps and technology platforms should be approved by district technology coordinators (for security, compatibility with student devices, etc.) before usage. Additionally, schools should devise a protocol for students to ask for and receive replacements for either their devices or device accessories in case of malfunction of either.

Technology Security and Privacy Considerations

#1

Educators must have parent/guardian consent for sharing of images/video (live and recorded), and alternative options should be available for students who do not give consent.

#2

Review district policy on students’ permissions for viewing (and sharing or not sharing) of educator-generated intellectual property (choreography, instruction, etc.).

#3

Review mandated reporter protocols for the digital age (procedures for witnessing/reporting potential instances of abuse or neglect via live or recorded video).

Technology Platforms

The platforms suggested below are an additional list to the initial 24 platforms highlighted in the Guidelines Document of 2020. Reference September Ready Fall 2020 page 35, for more.

To view the full list of technology platforms, reference Expanded Technology Considerations.

Section Resources

Professional Development

To support educators in navigating in-person learning along with SEL and trauma-informed teaching, professional development workshops in their discipline are important factors in supporting their students and expanding their classrooms. Below are recommendations for professional development for dance educators. Reference September Ready Fall 2020 page 37, for more. 

Recommendations

#1

Join the National Dance Education Organization and Dance New Jersey to connect and network with other state and national dance educators and resources through professional development workshops, forums, and research.

#2

Set aside time for staff community building and Professional Learning Communities (PLC) to reconnect, process their emotions and experiences, reflect on what they have learned and how they are applying social and emotional competencies, and collaborate on ways to support students’ SEL for returning to in person instruction.

#3

Recognizing the physical activity aspect of Dance, “consider collaborations with colleagues in physical education, exercise science, and athletic departments on strategies for safely returning to physical practice. Use these alliances to advocate for dance within your institution.” NDEO Teaching Dance in Fall 2020

To view a full list of the following, reference Expanded Professional Development.

  • Suggested Workshop Topics
  • Workshop Sources
  • List of Suggested Purchases

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Introduction

Music instruction should resume in full within appropriate environments that follow local and Arts Ed NJ guidance as districts resume in-person instruction and activities. Music education includes General Music, Non-Traditional Ensembles, Vocal and Instrumental Ensembles, and Music Electives, as well as co-curricular experiences such as Marching Band, Ensembles, Concerts, Competitions, Festivals, Showcases, and other performance and educational experiences outside of the regular school day.

None of the student learning opportunities/experiences mentioned above should be omitted from music curricula nor should these opportunities be taken away from students for any reason as districts return to in-person learning. Institutions should not opt to cancel or reduce music experiences. What was offered pre-Covid can and should be offered post-Covid. District budgetary support and Cares Act/ESSER funding should be considered as primary options to support the successful implementation of similar or better music learning opportunities for the student body. For recommendations on how/where to use the Cares Act/ESSER funding for music, please refer to the ArtsEdNJ Guidance for Use of Elementary and Secondary Emergency Relief Funds site.

All music and ensemble instruction should occur with the maximum number of students permitted in classroom/rehearsal spaces while following local guidelines for social distancing at the time of any particular event. If designated performing arts facilities were utilized for music instruction prior to the pandemic, those venues should be utilized once again for music instruction. Performance venues and instructional spaces that may have been used to temporarily accommodate non-arts instruction should return to its original purpose.

Because the health and safety of our teachers, staff, and students are paramount to all decisions made, the guidance presented here is designed to be flexible in order to meet the varied needs of students and educators in the K-12 music classrooms across the state. Collaboration between administrators and educators is an essential step in determining how to apply these considerations in each school. Ultimately, the collaboration between local administration and music educators will be essential in determining how to safely apply these considerations in schools.

Music Education and COVID-19

Over the last year, music educators, schools, and districts have worked to adapt practices to ensure quality music education while working within federal, state, and local guidelines for health and safety in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. As we look ahead to the 2021-22 school year, many of the strategies and examples provided in the September Ready Fall 2020 guidance from ArtsEdNJ can be referenced for ideas and resources to support any modifications necessary given the specific circumstances within each school and program. These resources can be accessed here: https://www.artsednj.org/wp-content/uploads/NJ-September-Ready-Arts-Ed-Guidance.pdf

Music educators, schools and districts should celebrate the many areas of perseverance and growth this year and look to continue to build upon this work as we return to fully in-person schooling in September. 

Areas of growth and/or positive outcomes many music programs experienced, despite the impact of Covid-19, include:

  • Increase in use and access to instructional technology resources to support music education
  • Frequent and meaningful collaboration between teachers across schools, departments, districts, and the state
  • Creative enrichment/interdisciplinary projects and partnerships with classroom teachers
  • New options to differentiate and support student individual learning needs with the use of technology tools
  • New and creative instructional strategies and practices to support student learning in music across the artistic processes of creating, performing, responding, and connecting
  • Increased attention and focus on the importance of embedding social teaching practices into instruction in order to support the social and emotional learning of all students
 

Guidance for Instrumental Music (Wind Instruments)

Indoor instrumental ensembles, small groups, and individual lessons, classes and activities are possible and should continue or resume immediately. 

Just as our students are able to return to school following proper mitigation strategies the same is true for the performing arts. Educators and school districts should follow state and local health guidelines for the return to school. 

Instrument Bell Covers: 

If there is a local mask requirement in place wind instruments should use bell covers. Appropriate bell covers have been found to significantly reduce the spread of aerosols.  To be most effective, they should be double layered with a merv-13 rated fabric or filter. Students may have their regular mask around the neck to be used when they are playing the wind instrument and then pull the mask into the face when they are not playing.

NOTE: Flutes and Recorders do not need any covering as they do not generate aerosols.

Return To Music Strategies

NFHS LogoThe National Federation of State High School Associations has developed a complete series of strategies for the return to music.

Topic include: Scheduling, Recruitment, Retention, Advocacy, Performances and Evaluating Your Students, Student Social Emotional Learning (SEL), Teacher Well Being, Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief Fund (ESSER) Opportunities for Music Education, Learning Acceleration, Curriculum Adjustments, Summer Opportunities, General Music Education, Secondary Ensemble Considerations, Student Teachers, School Owned Equipment and Uniforms, Cleaning Guidelines, Student Eligibility, State Association Changes, and Reporting Differences and Walking Back into the Classroom

You may access this information at the NFHS website

Concerts & Performances

Music educators and ensemble directors are able to resume in-person performances outside of the typical school day. Co-curricular music experiences should continue through both in person and or virtual learning platforms, including local, regional, and state festivals and programming as available. Such opportunities allow for state and or national recognition and college scholarship opportunities and will continue regardless of the platform the programs are delivered. State and local guidelines regarding indoor attendance should be adhered to.

Mask and Mitigation Guidance

Schools and districts should follow local mask guidance in establishing requirements for performers and audience members. If personal protective equipment (PPE) is required, please refer to the following guidance, as PPE should meet minimum current CDC guidelines. See the Health and Safety Guidance tab of this report.

Guidance Regarding HVAC for All Spaces

Please refer to the Association for Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) guidance on ventilation during COVID-19: https://www.ashrae.org/technical-resources/resources

Marching Band Specific Considerations

The following guidance is based upon regulations as of July, 2021, as many marching bands begin rehearsal in June and continue through the summer.  Once we are in school in September, 2021, please follow the guidance listed earlier in this document for indoor rehearsals.

l Distancing
  • There are no social distancing requirements. 
l Masking
  • No instrument PPE is necessary outdoors.
  • When indoors, multi-layered bell covers for brass and reed instruments should be used at all times. 
  • When indoors, face coverings that cover both the nose and mouth that are well fitting and multi-layered should be used; including wind players when not playing a wind instrument.
l Air Flow and Time
  • There are no limits on outdoor rehearsal time
  • If using a tent for adverse weather exposure outdoors, the tent should have a high-pitched roof and all four sides should be open. 
l Hygiene
  • Individuals should wash their hands for a minimum of 20 seconds with warm water and soap before touching any surfaces or participating in rehearsals with hand sanitizer being plentiful during rehearsal.
  • Shared musical equipment should be wiped down thoroughly before and after an individual’s use of equipment. Each student should have their own mouthpiece, reeds, sticks, etc.
  • All students shall bring their own water bottles. Water bottles must not be shared
l Spectators
  • Limitations on spectators should conform to local and state health department recommendations. 
l General

Guidance for Vocal and General Music with Singing

Recommendations and resources are provided for best practices in lesson planning and delivery for transitioning back into the choir classroom with consideration for student needs and populations. Indoor general music, individual and group or ensemble singing classes and activities are possible and should continue or resume immediately.

Just as our students are able to return to school following proper mitigation strategies the same is true for the performing arts. Educators and school districts should follow state and local health guidelines for the return to school.

Regarding the use of a well-fitted mask while singing:  Districts should follow local and state guidelines regarding mask mandates.  If masks are required in your district, the use of a well-fitted, multi-layer face covering while singing should be in place.

General Music and Non-Ensemble Music Courses

Music education should resume in designated classrooms for general music and music electives. If music educators were traveling “on a cart” or teaching in alternative spaces, the designated music classrooms should be restored to fully support music instruction. 

If instructional time in music was decreased or eliminated for any reason in 2020-21, the same or more time should be restored into the school schedules for all music courses and electives. 

Educators and schools can continue to reference resources provided in the September Ready 1.0 Guidance from ArtsEdNJ to support specific situations (teaching on a cart, technology resources, working with mitigations, etc.)

Professional Development & Resources

Opportunities from districts, state music organizations, and industry professionals must be offered to staff specialists and participation/attendance should be supported by the district. Additionally, investment in virtual learning platforms and digital resources should continue even as school districts transition back to full time in-person learning. Virtual learning platforms enhance the learning process asynchronously while meeting ESSA mandates to provide students a dynamic well-rounded education regardless of the learning environment. The following are relevant and important topics in our field that should be focus points for further PD.

  • Culturally responsive curriculum and resources
  • Anti-racist pedagogy
  • LGBTQ-inclusive curriculum
  • Examining curriculum, resources, and materials for representation of all people and to highlight the contributions of POC, LGBTQ artists, and disabled artists.
  • SEL Competencies (2020 NJSLS VPA & SEL Crosswalk)
  • Unpacking and understanding our new standards with the four Artistic Processes of Creating, Performing, Responding, Connecting  (https://njartsstandards.org/

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K-12 Theatre Arts Instruction

Theatre Arts instruction should resume in full within appropriate environments that meet current CDC guidelines as districts resume in-person instruction and activities. Theatre Arts education includes: 1) sequential curricular instruction such as prerequisite theatre programs, creative dramatics/drama cycle courses, stagecraft & technical theatre classes, etc.; 2) student theatre experiences such as school productions, competitions, festivals, and showcases; and 3) theatre fieldwork placements & internship experiences through partnerships with arts organizations and colleges/universities.

None of the student learning opportunities/experiences mentioned above should be omitted from theatre curricula nor should these opportunities be taken away from students for any reason as districts return to in-person learning. Institutions should not opt to cancel or reduce theatre arts experiences. What was offered pre-Covid can and should be offered post-Covid. District budgetary support and Cares Act/ESSER funding should be considered as primary options to support the successful implementation of similar or better theatre arts opportunities for the student body. For recommendations on how/where to use the Cares Act/ESSER funding for theatre arts, please refer to the ArtsEdNJ Guidance for Use of Elementary and Secondary Emergency Relief Funds site.

Studio and/or classroom theatre arts instruction should occur with the maximum number of students permitted in studio/classroom spaces while following the most current CDC recommendations/NJ Board of Health recommendations and mandates at the time of any particular event. If designated performing arts venues were utilized for theatre arts instruction prior to the pandemic, those venues should be utilized once more for theatre instruction. Performance venues and instructional spaces that may have been used to temporarily accommodate non-theatre arts instruction should return to its original purpose. In addition, alternative outside spaces should be envisioned, explored, created, and utilized when appropriate to afford enhanced instructional opportunities and institute a method of best practices while also taking into account the most recent health guidelines at the time of any event/activity in question.

Health and theatre safety instruction should be paramount as theatre arts activities, events, and productions resume inside school buildings and performance venues. Proper instruction of Covid-19 precautions should be incorporated into any current curricular health and theater safety education. If health and theater safety is not part of the current theatre or drama curriculum, this return to in-person instruction can become an opportunity to highlight the importance of adhering to health guidelines and theater safety so that proper work behavior and theatre practice can be followed by students and staff. (NJ Department of Health, Actors Equity Covid-19 InformationNFHS-EdTA Theater Safety Course)

Regular weekly Covid testing for unvaccinated personnel (students/staff) should be provided by school districts in addition to daily health screening prior to entrance of facilities and gatherings of groups for all theatre arts related events/activities. Proper contact tracing procedures should be established prior to the start of class/production meetings/rehearsals and approved by building or district administration so that proper procedures can be followed in the case of a positive test.

Performances & Theatre Arts Events

Theatre Arts specialists, directors, choreographers, and coaches are able to resume in-person performances outside of the typical school day. With a significant portion of New Jersey students experiencing theatre education only through co-curricular programming such as a school production or through participating in state theatre competitions and festivals, co-curricular theatre experiences should continue through both in person and or virtual learning platforms.  State and national theatre organizations such as (STANJ, NJ Thespians, and EdTA)  are waiting until the fall to determine if events with large multi-school participation can happen in person or through virtual platforms. Student theatre art opportunities allow for state and or national recognition and college scholarship opportunities and will continue regardless of the platform the programs are delivered. 

Mask/Mitigation Guidance Indoors

If there is a mask requirement, no additional mitigation is required other than the mask/mitigation policy established for people on district grounds. Theatre arts activities should continue without additional mitigation procedures. Refer to the following guidance as personal protective equipment (PPE) should meet minimum current CDC guidelines.

https://www.nj.com/education/2021/05/expect-nj-school-mask-requirements-in-fall-when-full-in-person-classes-resume-murphy-says.html

Indoor Facility Cleaning Procedures

  • Regular cleaning of facilities should be a daily occurrence, strictly adhered to, and recorded on a shared living document that is accessible to all parties and viewable to anyone who might be entering the space.
  • Theatre Arts Instructors/Facilitators and/or House Managers in addition to Custodial Staff must have access to the proper cleaning supplies for a space
  • Theatre Arts Instructors/Facilitators and/or House Managers in addition to Custodial Staff must know you are in the space so proper cleaning protocols can take place before and after use of space (including performance area, back of house offices, dressing areas, green rooms, production areas, storage spaces etc.)
  • Paper Checklist Outside the Space – A cleaning checklist should be posted outside the space for people to initial with date/time to maintain a hard copy record
  • Consider outdoor venues or creating outdoor performance and/or instructional areas if indoor venues are too small for the intended event
  • Need extensive glove use wiping of door handles, push plates, doorways, railings, light switches, thermostats, cabinet handles, telephones, computers, keypads, mouse, backstage and technical equipment, and trash receptacle touch points
  • Social distancing on stage should be in compliance with current recommendations for vaccinated and/or unvaccinated people
  • If a microphone is used during event or class – It must be properly wiped down and put away in a clean/non-contaminated location – How to Clean Shure Microphones
  • Props & Wigs should be used by a single student and should be washed or cleaned regularly while all temporary makeup tools should be discarded after one use.
  • All permanent tools should be cleaned regularly.
l Technical Booth(s)
  • Technical Booth(s) should have space for stage management, lighting operator, and sound operators according to current social distancing best practices 
  • If possible, the sound operator should be moved into the House
  • All boards must be wiped down after each use
l Box Office / Will Call
  • All windows protected by glass partitions
  • Where there are no physical barriers between ticket staff and patrons, a clear protective shield is recommended
  • If no physical Box Office, place 2 tables side by side (width to width) to ensure safe distance from patron to Box Office Attendant
  • If Applicable, recommend Credit Card/Chip reader so no physical money gets exchanged
  • Patron distancing can be preserved by opening fewer windows and marking appropriate queuing space
  • On-site ticket purchase and pickup can be eliminated for events that accept only electronic tickets by advanced purchase
l Auditorium Spaces for Patrons 
  • Do not exceed state guidelines at time of performance
  • All must wear a mask in facility
  • Students must wear masks for any rehearsals happening within the hours of a school day
  • Conduct temperature checks of audience members.
  • Monitor bathrooms to ensure social distancing is being adhered to (consult with custodial staff)
  • Sanitizer stations throughout space (consult with custodial staff).
  • Extensive wiping of door handles, push plates, doorways, railings, light switches, thermostats, cabinet handles, telephones, computers, keypads, mouse, backstage and technical equipment, and trash receptacle touch points
  • Wall Mounted Non Contact Forehead Thermometer 
  • Density – Measures the amount of people in space
  • SEEK Thermal Scan
l Backstage
  • All sets, prop pieces, etc. need to be wiped down during & after rehearsals/performances with CDC-approved disinfectant
  • Concession stand items should be prepackaged
  • Where possible have separate entrance and exit doors with marked arrows on the floor
  • Provide a hand-washing station and have hand sanitizer readily available in the dressing rooms, green rooms, backstage and all other production areas.

Guidance Regarding HVAC for All Spaces

Please refer to the Association for Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) guidance on ventilation during COVID-19: https://www.ashrae.org/technical-resources/resources

Outdoor Event Options

This document was created as guidance for creating and producing successful outdoor shows. This is based on research found from events that have already happened or documents that have already been created based in the NJ, PA, DE, & NY area.

Mask Guidance Outdoors

At this time there are no statewide social distancing or mask requirements and all people should refer to their district’s rules, regulations, and expectations.

Rehearsals

  • Hold smaller in person rehearsals
  • Host virtual rehearsals if needed
  • Utilize outside performance spaces
  • Encourage students to bring their own marked water bottles
  • No sharing of food or beverages
  • Wipe down or spray all surfaces—chairs, set pieces, props, rails, technical hardware, etc.—before and after rehearsal, using CDC-approved disinfectants
  • Provide scripts for each student—ideally digitally—that honor copyright restrictions

Professional Development & Resources

Opportunities from districts, state theatre organizations, and industry professionals must be offered to staff specialists and participation/attendance should be supported by the district. Additionally, investment in virtual learning platforms and digital resources should continue even as school districts transition back to full time in-person learning. Virtual learning platforms enhance the learning process asynchronously while meeting ESSA mandates to provide students a dynamic well-rounded education regardless of the learning environment. The following are relevant and important topics in our field that should be focus points for further PD.

  • Culturally responsive curriculum and resources
  • Anti-racist pedagogy
  • LGBTQ-inclusive curriculum
  • Examining curriculum, resources, and materials for representation of all people and to highlight the contributions of POC, LGBTQ artists, and disabled artists.
  • SEL Competencies (2020 NJSLS VPA & SEL Crosswalk)
  • Unpacking and understanding our new standards with the four Artistic Processes of Creating, Performing, Responding, Connecting  (https://njartsstandards.org/

Theatrical Licenses

Online Streaming

  • Utilize online streaming/ ticketing sites
  • If you do not want to LiveStream, you can also film in advance, edit, and then send the ticket company of your choice a link. A site like Booktix will take that link and distribute a protected link to your ticket holders.
    • Some shows that have also been made for TV/Movies will not allow live streaming (ex. Addams Family)
    • Create larger marketing campaigns via social media, local newspapers/ magazines, YouTube, etc.
  • Rehearsal Live Share from RealTime Music Solutions. 

Summer Professional Development for Scheduling

Clear communication with staff on what a particular teaching schedule for a particular course will look like is paramount for the successful and immediate September start of student learning experiences for a school to be truly, “September Ready.” Appropriate summer PD is encouraged for staff so there can be an opportunity for staff to envision the new school building and so an instructor will have adequate time to understand the new flexible schedule.

Professional Development for Shared Space

Recommended Learning Platforms & Resources

Resources

Utilize this link to find additional information on content, field trips, social media, technical theatre, technology for live streaming or virtual productions, related arts, financial assistance, podcasts, and related resource articles. 

Remote & Hybrid Theatre Resources

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Elementary, Middle, and High School Visual Art
ALL in Person

Recognizing the COVID Gaps

Fall Review:
  • Going back to basics of the Elements & Principle of Art/Design
  • Pre-assess where the gaps are from the previous year
  • Have time for students to transition.
  • Create a classroom that can use communal art materials/supplies.
  • Spend more time welcoming students back to school.
  • Create lessons with SEL in mind.

Instructional Strategies

In-person learning:
  • Conduct virtual orientations prior to start of school where students and parents can “meet” teachers and peers using a rotating bell schedule.

  • Develop skill-based art education lessons where students are introduced to skills that build on each other in order to intelligently translate objects into drawings, paintings, and sculptures. These are easily taught during chunked asynchronous videos followed by independent student practice. Teachers can use remote synchronous class time for discussion and feedback of student work. In-person class time students will be able to apply those skills for the larger scale projects.

  • Infuse art history/art culture into every skills-based lesson by combining the use of YouTube videos to introduce a diversity of artist and art culture, paired with teacher instructional video posted to google classroom supporting better understanding of the “what, how and why” in arts learning.

  • After recognizing any gaps, ensure that lessons build upon previous experiences since much of the hands-on will occur without the benefit of having a teacher watching and guiding techniques.

  • Maximize the use of tasks for presenting, responding and connecting artistic processes in conjunction with creating process tasks. Students can create works of art while discussing and analyzing their process by engaging in discourse. 

  • Students should be able to talk or write about their creation of their artwork so teachers can track and give feedback on their development.

  • Engage students with art learning and making tasks that support and strengthen SEL competencies for self and social awareness and that emphasize personal responsibility to accomplish tasks as scheduled.

  • Implement daily or weekly question prompts for journaling to access SEL competencies (self and social awareness) in the artmaking process. Students can write critical analysis of strategically selected works of arts, including works by contemporary artists. Teachers should provide writing prompts such as “How does this artwork reflect aspects of your life?”

  • Intentionally schedule critique and feedback sessions with teacher/student and peer/peer to develop relationship skills in the process of learning.

  • Develop visually exciting lessons using documents and videos with images that capture student attention.

  • Write lessons that have multiple opportunities for learning that are beyond hands-on. For example – study an artist via video, teach the techniques used by the artist via video, practice techniques in-person, create art in-person. Follow these tasks with lessons at home around analysis of the artist’s and student-created work. Students can video themselves giving verbal reflections, read their own reflective writings or poems about the works.

  • Design “long term” projects that involve online research. Some tasks can be completed offsite and other tasks conducted in class time for “hands-on” work. An example can be a virtual museum tour to locate artworks as inspiration around a particular theme for creating an original body of work using a particular style or merging two styles (grades 6-12).

  • Train students to develop digital displays and art exhibitions.

  • Create artworks using digital software where possible which can preserve precious consumable materials for other tasks.

  • Strengthen drawing and observation skills using basic supplies like pencils, colored pencils, crayons and sketchbooks (limited and strategic use of eraser). Many artmaking opportunities can be explored with basic mark making tools.

  • Design lessons as parts of modules with multiple tasks the learner (middle and high school) can develop independently with scheduled peer and teacher check-in supports and feedback. Use teacher made videos and YouTube (high school only for YouTube) for instructions and demonstrations.

  • Prepare and train students in the use of digital art portfolios, digital displays and virtual exhibitions to collect and share images of created artworks for peer and teacher review, feedback and personal/family enjoyment. This will also contribute to ongoing electronic cataloging for AP Studio Art.

  • Make art units more holistic to include a history and culture components, art skill or technique as a studio component, a presentation/exhibition component and critique which can all be created and recorded in a sketchbook. This can be supplemented with short and long writings which can be submitted electronically. These tasks allow for use of all artistic processes with limited supplies.

  • Schedule virtual field trips to museums, with artists, etc. that enhance the curriculum being taught.

  • Showcase student work continuously.

Technology Considerations

In-person learning:
  • Continue to use those technology tools to support learning such as Google Classroom and Google Suite for Education, Screencastify, Flipgrid, Edpuzzle, and Bitmoji Classroom, among others.

  • Consider Artsonia as the HUB for art instead of Google Classroom – Artsonia has really stepped up to make a new app that is much more powerful. It allows teachers to create and post their own demo videos. Then students can upload their own Gallery/Portfolio. Where teachers can then comment on the artwork – these comments are private to the student/parents/guardians only.

  • Continue to encourage other online assessments: exit tickets, posting reflections, checks for understanding and quizzes, Flipgrids presenting their work or doing art analysis, Jamboards, etc.

  • Prior to the start of school set up and enroll students in Google Classroom at the beginning of the year and use it as a tool for communication. This can aid in the transition from remote learning to in-person learning. As part of their class information letter ask parents for their email and add them as a guardian in the Google Classroom so they can receive weekly newsletters and updates.

  • Encourage students to use digital drawing and painting tools if that helps them to adapt into their in class setting.

Professional Development

  • Invest time for professional development on the new NJSLS for Visual and Performing Arts including the SEL competencies crosswalk with arts learning standards. Training can focus on understanding the standards, strategies to use within this environment.

  • Schedule workshops and classes for parents and students to experience online learning platforms for themselves. It makes it a lot easier for them to support their children if they are familiar with the platforms in use by the district/school.

  • Establish time and structures for PLCs (professional learning communities) with arts teachers to share and collaborate on best practices for student achievement.

  • Create opportunities for online resources such as the Art of Ed to provide professional development targeting specific needs to support student learners and improve teaching practice for student outcomes. 

In-Person with Restrictions

Scheduling, Facilities, & Social Distancing Requirements

For in-person:
  • Follow and adhere to all current CDC and State guidelines for facilities and social distancing requirements.

  • Engage students with art learning and making tasks that support and strengthen SEL competencies for self and social awareness and that emphasize personal responsibility to accomplish tasks as scheduled.

  • Limit the number of transitions during class for students.

  • Engage students with art learning and making tasks that support and strengthen SEL competencies for self and social awareness and that emphasize personal responsibility to accomplish tasks as scheduled.

  • Implement daily or weekly question prompts for journaling to access SEL competencies (self and social awareness) in the artmaking process. Students can write critical analysis of strategically selected works of arts, including works by contemporary artists. Teacher should provide writing prompts such as “How does this artwork reflect aspects of your life?”

  • Intentionally schedule critique and feedback sessions with teacher/student and peer/peer to develop relationship skills in the process of learning.

  • Develop visually exciting lessons using documents and videos with images that capture student attention.

  • Write lessons that have multiple opportunities for learning that are beyond hands on. For example – study an artist via video, teach the techniques used by the artist via video, practice techniques in-person, create art in-person. Follow these tasks with lessons at home around analysis of the artist’s and student created work. Students can video themselves giving verbal reflections, read their own reflective writings or poems about the works.

  • Design “long term” projects that involve online research. Some tasks can be completed offsite and other tasks conducted in class time for “hands-on” work. An example can be a virtual museum tour to locate artworks as inspiration around a particular theme for creating an original body of work using a particular style or merging two styles (grades 6-12).

  • Strengthen drawing and observation skills using basic supplies like pencils, colored pencils, crayons and sketchbooks (limited and strategic use of eraser). Many artmaking opportunities can be explored with basic mark making tools.

  • Create a shared drive of lessons, resources and lists of supplies to reimagine lessons based on availability of materials and supplies and mode of teaching.

  • Prepare and train students in the use of digital art portfolios, digital displays and virtual exhibitions to collect and share images of created artworks for peer and teacher review, feedback and personal/family enjoyment. This will also contribute to ongoing electronic cataloging for AP Studio Art.

  • Make art units more holistic to include a history and culture components, art skill or technique as a studio component, a presentation/exhibition component and critique which can all be created and recorded in a sketchbook. This can be supplemented with short and long writings which can be submitted electronically. These tasks allow for use of all artistic processes with limited supplies.

  • Showcase student work continuously.

Equipment, Materials, & Supplies

For in-person learning only:
  • Inventory supply closets and design projects based on available supplies. Consider if some supplies can be used for one class while different supplies are used with another class even if projects are different.
  • Establish clear classroom procedures (e.g… the supplies will be given to students instead of walking around the room to retrieve them) consistent with CDC and State guidelines for health and safety in the use of materials and equipment in common areas.
  • Order and prepare in advance of Fall for each grade band level. Provide guidelines for use and care of all supplies for ongoing use and store individually by class and then by student.
Basic art supplies are listed below:

Grades Prek-2 art kit recommendations: #2 pencil, eraser, colored pencils, crayons, glue, scissor, hand sharpener, crayons, white drawing paper, colored paper

Grades 3-5 art kit recommendations: #2 pencil, eraser, colored pencils, crayons, glue, scissor, hand sharpener, crayons, oil pastels, watercolors, paintbrushes, markers, sketchbook, colored paper

6th to 8th

Grades 6-8 art kit recommendations: basic drawing pencil set, eraser, colored pencils, glue, scissor, hand sharpener, tortillon/blending stump, crayons, oil pastels, watercolors, round watercolor brushes sizes 3, 6, 12, basic acrylic set, acrylic paintbrushes, markers, sketchbook, Sharpies, modeling clay, colored construction paper, 1:1 computer

9th to 12th

Grades 9-12 art kit recommendations: basic drawing pencil set, eraser, kneaded eraser, charcoal, colored pencils, glue, scissor, hand sharpener, tortillon/blending stump, crayons, oil pastels, watercolors, round watercolor brushes (sizes 3, 6, 12), basic acrylic set, acrylic paintbrushes, markers, sketchbook, Sharpies, modeling clay, colored paper, 1:1 computer

 

Technology Considerations

For hybrid, in-person and remote learning:
  • Ensure a digital device and internet Wi-Fi access/hotspot access for all students and staff on a 1:1 basis. Students in the same family should have access to their own individual learning device. Seek assistance from companies to help families/parents to gain internet access in partnership with the district.

  • Identify whether students have a digital camera or camera phone to capture images for upload and review in digital portfolios.

  • Establish district approved video conferencing and technology tools to support learning and management of learning such as Google Classroom and Google Suite for Education, Screencastify, Flipgrid, Edpuzzle, and Bitmoji Classroom, among others. Discover how learning management systems such as Canvas can support live instruction, provide instructional resources, learning with model videos and multiple submission options.

  • Consider Artsonia as the HUB for art instead of Google Classroom – Artsonia has really stepped up to make a new app that is much more powerful. It allows teachers to create and post their own demo videos. Then students can upload their own Gallery/Portfolio. Where teachers can then comment on the artwork – these comments are private to the student/parents/guardians only.

  • Encourage regular use of Chromebooks in the art classroom where students can use google classroom for exit tickets, posting reflections, checks for understanding and quizzes, Flipgrids presenting their work or doing art analysis, etc.

  • Set up and enroll students in Google Classroom at the beginning of the year and use it as a tool for communication during hybrid, in-person and remote learning. This can aid in the transition to remote learning if necessary, as students are already accustomed to using the tool. As part of their class information letter ask parents for their email and add them as a guardian in the Google Classroom so they can receive weekly newsletters and updates.

  • Use Chromebooks or other district supported electronic devices during in-person time in arts classrooms to train students in the use of digital drawing and painting tools using drawing apps available for Chromebook, etc., Students can continue to create digital artworks as an option in lieu of using traditional materials.

Professional Development

For in-person learning:
  • Establish a parent/student academy for tech training and support.
  • Provide PD to visual arts teachers in the use of technology tools to create digital artwork using hardware and software supported by school and district.
  • Holistic training for staff members on protocols and procedures to maintain social distancing for students.
For hybrid, in-person and remote learning:
  • Intensive training in CDC guidelines including ways to sterilize art supplies and materials if they need to be shared and time built into the school day for cleaning.

  • PD on What does the “new reality” mean for schools? Protocols, procedures, supporting students during a pandemic, etc.

  • Coordinated professional development for teachers to learn video conferencing platforms, Google Classrooms, Google Suite for Education, Screencastify, Flipgrid, Edpuzzle, Padlet, etc.

  • Instructing arts teachers in the use of available tools and technology for video recording, editing, and how to upload for student viewing and teacher ability to teach to students in upper grades.

  • Invest time for professional development on the new NJSLS for Visual and Performing Arts including the SEL competencies crosswalk with arts learning standards. Training can focus on understanding the standards, strategies to use within this environment, how we can shift teaching and learning, the social emotional aspect of teaching and learning during a pandemic (how are we supporting students/staff?).

  • Schedule workshops and classes for parents and students to experience online learning platforms for themselves. It makes it a lot easier for them to support their children if they are familiar with the platforms in use by the district/school.

  • Establish time and structures for PLCs (professional learning communities) with arts teachers to share and collaborate on best practices for student achievement.

  • Create opportunities for online resources such as the Art of Ed to provide professional development targeting specific needs to support student learners and improve teaching practice for student outcomes. This can be used for targeted PLCs such as “engaging students in the critique process” training for a team of teachers to implement during in-person, hybrid or remote learning.

  • Generate a list of digital tools, apps, and websites with a quick description of what the resources do and how to use them. For example, “Instagram allows people to share photos, others can comment on these photos.

Additional Resources and Citations

www.aenj.org

Featured Webinar on Demand – September Ready: Seven Principles for Planning & Preparation

https://artsednow2020.com/nj-arts-ed-summit-2020/  Recordings from the ArtsEdNow 2020 Summit June 16-18th.  – Lessons Learned and Looking Forward: School Years 2020–2021 and 2021–2022
NAEA Town Hall Conversations | April 20, 2021

www.SELARTS.org Social and Emotional Learning

https://njartsstandards.org/  NEW NJ Visual Arts Standards

https://www.arteducators.org/learn-tools/remote-learning-toolkit  NAEA Remote Learning Toolkit

Sample lessons using basic supplies

Grades 6-8 lesson on Understand the Life and Art of Henri Matisse

Grades 6-8 lesson on Textures

Grades 6-12 lesson on Line Value Techniques for Shading

Grades 6-12 lesson on Digital Darkroom slides

Grades 9-12 lesson on Art After Tragedy

Museums

https://www.newarkmuseumart.org/

https://www.state.nj.us/state/museum/

https://artmuseum.princeton.edu/

http://www.zimmerlimuseum.rutgers.edu/information/visitors#.Xv95ZihKjIU

https://www.groundsforsculpture.org/

SMART History (Art history Resources)

MOMA Teacher Resources

Guggenheim online

Metropolitan Museum of Art Resources Online for Educators

https://whitney.org/

Philadelphia Museum of Art Educator Resources

https://www.nga.gov/   – National Gallery of Art

https://nmaahc.si.edu/  – National Museum of African American History & Culture

https://crystalbridges.org/

The 75 Best Virtual Museum Tours Around the World [Art, History, Science, and Technology]

Getty.edu

Museivaticani.va

Nhm.ac.uk

Nationalgallery.org.uk

Google Arts & Culture App

Stuck at Home? These 12 Famous Museums Offer Virtual Tours You Can Take on Your Couch (Video)

https://upgradedpoints.com/best-virtual-museum-tours/  – 75 Best Virtual Museum Tours Around the World [Art, History, Science, and Technology]

Arts Education

(NEW) PBS Learning Media

(NEW) Nasco lesson plans

(NEW) Artsonia Project ideas

(NEW) NAEA Looking Forward

PBS KQED Art School

Take home 40 Art Challenges– Download this handout of 40 art challenges

Amber Kane; How to teach art online

K-12 Free Downloadable Art Learning Packets

https://www.artedguru.com/ – Covid19 Remote Teaching Resources

Jules White- Distance Learning

GRID OF ART SITES: Ready to stay creative from the couch? Here is your guide to enjoying art at home! (courtesy of our friends at MAEA)

https://myartlesson.com/free-resources-for-art-teachers/

http://discoveryk12.com/dk12/how-it-works/ – Discovery K12 provides a complete onlinecurriculum for Pre-K to 12th grade. All main subjects are covered, plus extra-curriculum courses.

Paula Mclain– Lessons and ideas she compiled from other art teachers, institutions, etc.

Art Prof is a free website for learning visual arts.

https://theartofeducation.edu/

Technology

How to Make Stop Motion Video: Ideas for iPad Movie Projects

Carol Bowen YouTube Videos of her flipped classroom

https://www.artedguru.com/copyright-statement.html

https://adaptablelearning.teachable.com/courses

https://www.novakeducation.com/iitb

www.PhotoPea.com – a web-based knockoff of Photoshop that is very, VERY close to it.

www.Canva.com -a great resource to teach kids design. They have free educational access for teachers.

https://www.gimp.org/  -Free and Open source Image Editor

Social Emotional Learning (SEL)

(NEW) Effective SEL Activities

(NEW) Nasco Art & SEL

(NEW) Art of Education Elementary School and SEL

www.SELARTS.org

Developing Curricula for SEL and the Arts

Arts Education and Social-Emotional Learning Outcomes Among K-12 Students

Social-Emotional Artistic Learning

Culturally Responsive Education

NYS ED.gov Culturally Responsive-Sustaining Education Framework http://www.nysed.gov/common/nysed/files/programs/crs/culturally-responsive-sustaining-education-framework.pdf

Seven Core Themes of the Culturally Responsive Arts Education Initiative https://www.heinz.org/userfiles/file/crae_corethemesfinal.pdf

The Education Alliance Brown University Culturally Responsive Teaching | Teaching Diverse Learners

Social Justice

Resources for Teaching Civil Unrest and Anti-Racism

Google Arts & Culture App

A best-of-the-best collection of resources for social justice- and equity-focused educators – Talking to Kids About Racism and Justice: a list for parents, caregivers & educators

15 Art Projects that Advocate for Social Justicehttps://www.artsednj.org/featured-webinar-september-ready-seven-principles-for-planning-and-preparation/ 

July 2020 Fall 2020 Guidance

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Arts & Culture Partners

Exposure to the arts and live or virtual performances is important for students because…

“many of them will choose to pursue arts related fields, and we need to show them the possibilities, and the value…plus they enjoy all types of arts, and are more engaged and enjoy school more.”

Teacher engaged with Count Basie Center for the Arts

Why partner with arts & cultural organizations? The power of collaboration.

Partnerships and collaborations with arts and culture partners are an integral part of a well-rounded arts education for New Jersey students. Pre COVID-19, 89% of schools in New Jersey benefitted from access to arts-based professional development for teachers and administrators, long and short-term artist residencies with professional teaching artists, curriculum-based field trips, arts integration strategies, and other arts experiences that support the multiplicity of learners in the school environment.

Since March 2020 arts and culture partners have offered virtual learning opportunities in hundreds of New Jersey schools. Deploying their boundless creativity and innovation, teaching artists, museum educators, and performers have ensured that students learning at home or in hybrid environments have continued to engage in creative, energizing, and affirming experiences. For many students, these experiences were among the very few that engaged their minds, bodies and spirits during such a difficult year. 

In the return to in-person schooling, your arts and culture partners will play a critical role in helping students and their families build and sustain community, cultural understanding, support student social-emotional learning and improve student academic achievement. Partnership among certified arts educators, classroom teachers and teaching artists is a distinguishing asset of New Jersey’s arts education ecosystem, championed by the national policy statement “Arts Education is Essential.”

 

How Did Arts and Culture Partners Support Students & Educators During the Pandemic? The Power of Creativity

During the past year arts and culture partners have worked nimbly and thoughtfully to maintain consistent presence in schools, to meet present day needs in all school formats:

Arts Ed Newark

Arts Ed Newark brought Trauma-Informed Care and Healing-Centered Practices to the City’s Arts Educators and Community Leaders. While ensuring delivery of high-quality rigorous arts learning in safe student centered spaces, our professional development with youth practitioners focused on important elements of trauma-informed learning environments such as: creating spaces where students feel culturally, emotionally, and physically safe; building trust; giving students choice and control over participation; creating shared power and relationships through collaboration; empowering youth by building on their strengths; and building cultural humility and responsiveness.

Count Basie

Count Basie Center for the Arts presented pre-recorded virtual performances with two-week unlimited access to schools across the state. While attending live performances was not possible, virtual performances helped provide access to arts & culture, engaging them in connected classroom content as well. Additionally, pre- and post-show workshops with teaching artists streamed into in-person and virtual classrooms provided additional arts experiences related to the content of the performance and helped meet teacher goals for the performance and curricula.

Nai Ne Chen Dance

The Nai-Ni Chen Dance Company brings socially and emotionally supportive dance projects virtually and in-person to schools across NJ. The Company’s Dance To Learn projects engage students with the pure joy of dance and rhythm, helping them to connect with each other while exploring their bodies with the wonderful, generative power of dance.  The Company’s virtual and live presentation of The Art of Chinese Dance brings Asian American cultural awareness to the school partner.  It’s special Lunar New Year Celebration: Red Firecrackers, highlights the importance of cultural traditions in the community.   

Nai Ne Chen Dance

Rutgers-Camden Center for the Arts prepared a public art field guide for families and groups (available at anewviewcamden.com) and will provide live and zoom outdoor museum education tours for this Bloomberg Public Art Philanthropies Public Art Challenge project, comprised of six large public artworks at six sites that address the theme of illegal dumping through the arts. These sessions address the issues of environmental justice, alternatives and solutions to illegal dumping, and STEAM topics such as urban biodiversity and biologically-driven recycling. Addressing justice issues through the arts allows for a meaningful dialogue about community and the planet.

Symphony in C

Symphony in C presented pre-recorded and live-streamed virtual instrumental lessons, assembly performances, Music Together pre-K classes, a virtual residency and a virtual field trip. The teaching artists worked with the music teacher as well as classroom teachers to meet curriculum goals.

Young Audiences Arts for Learning

Young Audiences Arts for Learning provided live virtual performances, live virtual artist in residence programs as well as pre-recorded experiences. Through use of chat windows and interactive features, students engaged directly with teaching artists, expressing their creative voice and moving beyond the screen. For example, students participated in multi-day residency in photography, creating self portraits. Young Audiences also offered over 25 professional learning opportunities for artists, teachers and arts administrators on inclusive teaching practices, anti-racism in the arts classroom, culturally responsiveness and many other relevant topics. 

The Zimmerli Museum

The Zimmerli Art Museum did a virtual visual literacy program with the Academy of Allied Health and Sciences in Neptune, NJ, to help high school students understand the importance of close looking. This program, where students observe, describe, and analyze works of art, is essential in helping students hone their observational skills, key for the many participating students who plan to enter the medical field. Learning to describe what you see and assess how all the pieces work together can help promote more careful diagnosis in medicine, but also be applied to other fields where problem solving is an integral part of the job. Teachers reported that participating students were able to think through problems more carefully and work better as a team.

The Artists in Education Grant Program (AIE)

The Artists in Education Grant Program (AIE) offers NJ pre-K-12 schools customized 20-day artist in residence programs. In 2020-2021 most residencies were conducted through online platforms, a few were offered in person due to the nature of their endeavors. For example, Hopewell Elementary School engaged a poetry teaching artist to guide students in nature-based poetry writing. One example of a virtual artist in residence program is Charles C. Polk in Roselle where students studied the history of hip hop dance, while creating and performing original dances to reflect the role of young people in the civil rights movement. 

The Arts Professional Learning Institute (APLI)

The Arts Professional Learning Institute (APLI) is New Jersey’s arts education professional learning opportunity that pairs teaching artists and school partners in collaborative, engaging workshops throughout the state. APLI offered its cohort of participants a fully-virtual experience, in topics such as Arts Equity for Disabled Students, Creative Safe Spaces for LGBTQ+ voices and English Language Learners in the Arts Classroom.

The Artists in Education Residency Grant Program & the Arts Professional Learning Institute is a co-sponsored project of the New Jersey State Council on the Arts and Young Audiences Arts for Learning NJ & Eastern PA. AIE is carried out in partnership with regional partners, including Appel Farm Arts & Music Campus, Count Basie Center for the Arts, and Morris Arts. APLI It is generously supported by the Grunin Foundation and Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation.

How will your Arts and Culture Partners Support the Return to In Person Schooling? The Power of Partnerships

Your arts and culture partners have emerged strong and ready to embrace the needs of the return to in-person schooling, understanding that the journey ahead will require partnership, collaboration, creativity and vision, including the following commitments: 

Students
First

Arts and cultural partners will prioritize the needs of students in program planning and implementation. 

SEL and Cultural Responsiveness

The impact of the pandemic and the uprising against racism necessitate significant support for educators and students. Arts and cultural partners have prioritized Social Emotional Learning (SEL) and Culturally Responsive practices.  Arts and cultural partners support collaborative classroom environments where all students feel a spirit of belonging and can emotionally, intellectually and creatively thrive.  

NJ State Learning Standards

Planning and programming will include state learning standards to be addressed, inclusive of arts standards and other subject matter.

Adaptable and Flexible Programming for all School Environments

Arts and cultural partners will adapt program formats and work flexibly with school partners.

Health & Safety

Arts and culture partners will adhere to school requirements for PPE, social distancing, and any other modifications for in-building programs.

Technology

Advance information on technology platforms used in-school and for remote learning is needed for partners to prepare. Partners are adept in school platforms and online interactive tools. 

Collaborative Program Development and Implementation

Teacher/educator involvement is required for all learning activities provided by partners. Collaborative pre-planning will include a discussion of desired interactivity, materials needed, space needs and other keys to sucess. Arts and culture partners will work collaboratively to ensure students can access the experience, using captioning, sign interpretation and other tools as needed.

What can your Arts and Culture Partners Provide? Powerful Programming

To accommodate in person, hybrid and virtual schooling, arts and culture partners are prepared to offer in-person live and virtual arts experiences and on-demand content to students and school communities. Below is a list (as of June 2021) of some partners offerings for the 2021-2022 school year. This list is by no means comprehensive, as many organizations are in the process of developing innovative and responsive programming.

There are many ways to learn more about engaging with artists, arts & culture organizations, educational, and family events in your area. Contact these organizations below to learn more:

Arts Ed Newark

Discover Jersey Arts 

New Jersey State Council on the Arts – County Arts Agency Local Arts Program

South Jersey Cultural Alliance

Arts & Culture Partners

Artistic DisciplinesOrganization2021-2022 Program Offerings (Virtual, Hybrid, or In-Person)Contact Information
Dance
Media Arts
Music
Theatre
Visual Art
Appel Farm Art and Music CenterShort- and long-term residency programs; professional learning for teachersKristina Hill
khill@appelfarm.org
Dance
Music
Theatre
Visual Art
Media Arts
Artist in Education Residency Grant Program (AIE)20-day artist in residence programsSamantha Clarke
sclarke@yanjep.org
Dance
Media Arts
Music
Theatre
Visual Art
Arts and Education CenterNew Jersey State Teen Arts Festival (www.njteenarts.com)
Arts High (www.artsandedcenter.org)
Kevin Ciak
kevin@artsandedcenter.org
Dance
Music
Theatre
Visual Art

Performances
Arts For KidsIn-person, virtual and hybrid in-school and afterschool Residency Programs and Professional development in music, drama, visual arts, dance, early childhood, and technology through the arts, as well as culturally diverse Arts-in-education live performances.
(Pre-K to Grade 12)
Vincent Ector
Executive Director
Vincent@artsforkidsinc.org
www.artsforkidsinc.org
Dance
Music
Theatre
Visual Art
Media Arts
Arts Professional Learning Initiative (APLI)Cohort model professional learning program for teaching artists, art educators and classroom teachersSamantha Clarke
sclarke@yanjep.org
Dance
Music
Theatre
Axelrod Performing Arts CenterThe Axelrod Performing Arts Academy offers Virtual and in-person artist residences with Broadway performers and professional dancers teaching Dance and Musical Theater, six days per week, for young people 12 and up plus a primary track for children 5-11.Andrew DePrisco,
Artistic Director
adeprisco@
axelrodartscenter.org
www.axelrodartscenter.org
Theatre

Field Trips
Centenary Stage CompanyLive performance
Hands-on workshops (materials provided)
Family and community building programs
Kayla Chirip,
Director of Development
kchirip@centenarystageco.org
Visual ArtcoLAB ArtsProfessional Development for teachers and short and long-term artist residencies connecting social justice and advocacy themes with artist response process.
https://colab-arts.org/virtualeducation
John Keller,
Director of Education
jpkeller@colab-arts.org
www.colab-arts.org
Dance
Music
Theatre
Visual Art

Field Trips
Count Basie Center for the ArtsVirtual and in-person options for school shows.
Short and long-term residencies after school programs, and/or family & community programs either in-person or virtually, inclusive or all artistic disciplines: in theatre, dance, visual art, music.
Samantha Giustiniani
sgiustiniani@thebasie.org
Visual ArtFrontline ArtsVirtual paper making workshops. In a series of sessions, we will walk your group through making handmade paper from start to finish with an assortment of pulp types. We also demonstrate printmaking techniques.Rachel Heberling,
Executive Director
rachel@frontlinearts.org
https://www.frontlinearts.org/frontlinepaper-foryouth
TheatreGeorge Street PlayhouseGSP offers Professional Development for teachers, K-12 artist-in-residence programs for students, theatre classes for youth and adults, and touring theatre programs for schools. Anchored in SEL and theatre arts integration practices, school-based programs build creativity, collaboration and academic achievement in ELA, Social Studies and Science content areas.Jim Jack
jjack@georgestreetplayhouse.org
Visual ArtGlassRootsVirtual and in-person options for all glass art programming; short and long-term residencies; youth entrepreneurial afterschool programs; adult workforce programs; private group workshops; public classes and professional development for educators.Lisa Duggan,
Program Director
lduggan@glassroots.org
www.glassroots.org
Visual ArtLong Beach Island Foundation of the Arts & SciencesProfessional Learning
Opportunities for Teachers
Live Performance
Hands-on workshops (materials provided)
Student Competition
After-school Youth Programming
Daniella Kerner,
Executive Director
dkerner@lbifoundation.org
www.lbifoundation.org
Media Arts
Music
Theatre
Visual Art

Field Trips
Luna StageLuna Stage offers classes for K-12th grade students and adults in acting, improvisation, playwriting, filmmaking, musical theatre and more, all taught by theatre professionals. Scholarships are available, many classes culminate in a final sharing or performance, and all skill levels are welcome. Luna also offers student matinees of all MainStage performances.Ari Laura Kreith,
Artistic Director
ari.laura.kreith@lunastage.org
www.lunastage.org
TheatreMcCarter Theatre CenterMcCarter Theatre offers in-person and online summer camps and after-school classes for K-12th grade students and adults, all taught by theatre professionals. Classes explore improvisation, monologue and scene writing, Shakespeare, dramaturgy, and creative movement. All skill levels are welcome, and scholarships are available. Many classes culminate in a final virtual sharing for invited guests.Brooke Boertzel,
Director of Education
and Engagement
bboertzel@mccarter.org
https://www.mccarter.org/education-community/classes-and-camps/
Visual Art

Field Trips
Montclair Art MuseumOnline, synchronous tours with art- making for schools and homeschooling/pods (supplies provided); online, synchronous
multi-week studio classes (supplies provided); asynchronous educational materials; synchronous professional development workshops for teachers; family programs. Programs designed with diversity, equity, access, and inclusion in mind.
Noaa Stoler,
Assistant Director,
K-12 Learning and Gallery Interpretation
nstoler@montclairartmuseum.org
www.montclairartmuseum.org
Media ArtsMontclair FilmVirtual classes in filmmaking, screenwriting, podcasting, acting, storytelling and related arts education for middle and high school students, as well as Professional Development designed to enhance remote learning. Small hands-on classes taught by experienced professionals.Sue Hollenberg,
Education Director
sue@montclairfilm.org
www.Montclairfilm.org/Education
Dance
Music
Theatre
Visual Arts
Morris ArtsVirtual artist in residence programs; virtual learning resourcesBarbara Reuther
breuther@morrisarts.org
Dance
Music
Theatre
Media Arts

Field Trips
Performances
New Jersey Performing Arts CenterVirtual & In-person Saturday and weekday after school classes in Jazz, Band, Hip Hop, and Acting; virtual PD for educators; virtual SchoolTime performances and workshops; virtual live and pre-recorded video in-school residencies.Vicky Revesz,
Director,
School and Community
Programs
vrevesz@njpac.org
https://www.njpac.org/artseducation/
Literary ArtNew Jersey Poetry Out LoudPoetry Out Loud, a free customizable poetry recitation curriculum that encourages
students nationally in grades 9-12 to leverage poetry recitation as a dynamic tool for building social and emotional capacity. Not only do students share their interpretation and delivery of poetry; they also vie for awards and scholarships totaling $20,000. Additionally, New Jersey Poetry Out Loud offers a poetry community for teachers and students that’s provides professional development workshops, networking, and online experiences.
Register Today!
Erik Stratton
NJPOL Coordinator,
admin@njpol.org
www.njpol.org
Music

Performances
New Jersey Symphony OrchestraVirtual instrumental masterclasses and clinics; virtual PD for instrumental music educators (one on one and small group sessions on topics of their choice); access to digital library of enrichment and instructional videos and in person assembly programsJudy Lee, Director of Operations & Community Programs, reach@njsympnony.org
Visual Art

Field Trips
Newark Museum of ArtVirtual field trips (grades Pre-K-High School with grade-level specific content); virtual residencies in arts education and STEM. Professional development for teachers on various topics including mindfulness, diversity and inclusion and arts integration; virtual family programs focused on art making, storytelling, music, art and science. Creative Play for children ages 3-5 years old. Summer Art in the Garden programs.Sarah Schettig,
Manager of School and Teacher Programs

sschettig@newarkmuseumart.org

https://www.newarkmuseumart.org/virtual-field-trips

https://www.newarkmuseumart.org/nmoaathome
Dance
Folk Arts
Music
Theatre
Visual Arts
Perkins Center for the ArtsVirtual and onsite classes/ lessons in pottery, drawing & painting, music, dance and after school arts exploration for K-12 students. Virtual Arts Residencies and professional development designed to support remote learning, SEL, DEI, STEAM, and Arts Integration through storytelling, as well as folk, environmental, visual, and performing arts. The Folklife Center at Perkins Center is host to the Homebound Arts in Healing Program, the Upon Our Authority virtual exhibition, The Butterfly Virtual Storytelling Concert Series, and a monthly podcast series.”Allison Hunt,
Director of Education
ahunt@perkinscenter.org
www.perkinsarts.org
Visual ArtRiverfront Renaissance Center for the ArtsGallery tours, In-person and virtual exhibits, After-school and Weekend youth workshops (virtual & in person), Adult Art Workshops (virtual & in-person), Student Art ExhibitsDiane Roberts,
Executive Director
diane@rrcarts.com
www.rrcarts.com
Dance
Music
Theatre
Rowan University Community Music SchoolCommunity Music lessons; Instrumental Ensembles, Theatre & Dance Academy, Professional Development for teachers; Engagement with University FacultyElizabeth Guerriero,
Director of Community
Music School & Educational
Partnerships
guerriero@rowan.edu
go.rowan.edu/communitymusic
DanceRoxey BalletRoxey Ballet is engaging our community and students in several ways: Through our virtual or in-person residency program; in person at our home theatre with education pods and learning programs; and through our live streamed and recorded performance events. Visit Roxey Ballet on Youtube for Videos and Enpointe interviews. https://www.youtube.com/user/roxeyballetLees Hummel,
Director,
Education and Outreach
roxeyoutreach@gmail.com
www.roxeyballet.org
Visual ArtRutgers Camden Center for the ArtsMuseum education at-home: online gallery tours & hands on kits, A New View Camden public art; livestream Stages of Discovery performances, Poetry Out LoudNoreen Scott Garrity
ngarrity@camden.rutgers.edu
Dance
Theatre
Sharron Miller’s Academy for the Performing ArtsShort- and long-term in-school and afterschool residencies in dance and drama (in-person, virtual, or hybrid); lecture-demonstrations; professional development workshops; dance curriculum options include creative movement, tap, hip hop, cultural dance (e.g., West African, Latin), jazz dance, and theater dance among other stylesSharron Miller,
Artistic Director
smiller@smapa.org
www.smapa.org
Music

Field Trips

Performances
Symphony in CIn-person and virtual instrumental lessons, Music Together classes, assembly programs, school field trips, artist-in-residence programs, Youth Orchestra, and Summer Music Camp.Pamela Brant
President
pbrant@symphonyinc.org
Media Arts
Visual Art
The Center for Contemporary ArtIn-person, virtual, and hybrid classes for children and adults in a broad range of media for all skill levels. In person classes for children with ASD and other special needs. Rotating on-site exhibitions of contemporary art.Elie Porter Trubert,
Executive Director
etrubert@ccabedminster.org
www.ccabedminster.org
Theatre

Field Trips
The Growing Stage - The Children's Theatre of New Jersey.In-person and virtual artist-in-residence programs, virtual after-school programs, virtual workshops, virtual field trips.Lori Lawrence,
Director of Educational
Programming
llawrence@growingstage.
com
www.growingstage.com
Dance
Media Arts
Music
Theatre
Visual Art
The Institute of Music for ChildrenVirtual and in-person group classes, private lesson and summer camp for children & teens in instrumental music, performing, visual and media arts. Grades 1-12. Financial Aid available. Arts residencies in many artforms for schools, community centers and more.Alysia Souder
Executive Director
asouder@instituteofmusic.org
www.instituteofmusic.org
Theatre

Field Trips
The Shakespeare Theatre of New JerseyVirtual and in-person workshops focused on language and performing Shakespeare's text; Virtual touring program (in-person touring/field trips may be available beginning in January); Student guide and workshop materials; Hybrid Shakespeare Book Club for teachers and adult-learners.Brian Crowe,
Director of Education
bcrowe@shakespearenj.org
www.shakespearenj.org
Dance
Music
Theatre
Trenton Circus SquadTrenton Circus Squad is offering 40-
60 minute virtual circus workshops and performances for youth organizations in the fall. Trenton Circus Squad can provide circus bags full of circus goodies that each participant can use to practice at home or in a classroom setting. Included in each bag are (3) juggling scarves, sculpting balloons, balance stick, and a clown nose.
Thomas von Oehsen,
Executive Director
tom@trentoncircussquad.org
www.trentoncircussquad.org
Folk Art

Field Trips
Tuckerton SeaportTuckerton Seaport offers online and on-water programs currently. On-Water programs include small group (up to 10 passengers) boat tours aboard our floating classroom. While onboard, guests will experience Barnegat Bay coastal culture with a focus on folk arts. The Seaport is also building an online library of folk arts resource videos. These videos pair folk artists and demonstrators with activities families can enjoy right now from home.
Floating Classroom Curriculum
Brooke Salvanto,
Executive Director
brookes@tuckertonseaport.org
www.tuckertonseaport.org
MusicWBGO Newark Public RadioWBGO's Education Hub Lesson plans for grades 3-12, based on Jazz Night in America documentary shorts, for teachers. Though designed for in-classroom teaching, the lessons can be modified for online instruction.Brandy Wood,
Marketing Manager
bwood@wbgo.org
https://www.wbgo.org/wbgo-education-hub
Dance
Folk Art
Music
Theatre
Visual Art
Media Arts

Performances
Young Audiences Arts for Learning New Jersey & Eastern PAAssembly performances, artist in residence programs, workshops, professional learning for teachers and for teaching artists. Programming offered in person or virtual.Donnajean Reckelhoff
donnajr@yanjep.org

Carol Hunt
chunt@yanjep.org
Visual Art

Field Trips
Zimmerli Art MuseumIn-person and virtual field trips customized to grade level and curricular goals, educator guides, preschool art and storytelling programs, family and youth art-making programs, and professional learning to unlock the power of art for allAmanda Potter
apotter@zimmerli.rutgers.
edu
https://zimmerli.rutgers.edu

Resources

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General Resources

International Performing Arts Coalition Aerosol Study (NFHS)

CDC Guidance for Schools

US Department of Education Return to School Road Map

New Jersey Department of Education: The Road Forward Learning Acceleration Guide

ESSER Funding

PROTECT ARTS ED NOW/School Budget

Social Emotional Learning and Arts Education

The Center for Arts Education and Social Emotional Learning

ArtsEdSEL.org

Arts Education Social & Emotional Learning Framework

https://selarts.org

Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL)

https://casel.org

A Nation at Hope – Recommendations from the National Commission on Social, Emotional, and Academic Development

http://nationathope.org/report-from-the-nation/

Arts Education and Social-Emotional Learning Outcomes Among K-12 Students

https://consortium.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/2019-05/Arts%20Education%20and%20Social-Emotional-June2019-Consortium%20and%20Ingenuity.pdf

Setting the Stage for Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Policy and the Arts

Scott N. Edgar and Maurice J. Elias

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10632913.2020.1777494

A Vision for Social Emotional Learning and Arts Education Policy

Scott Edgar and Bob Morrison

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10632913.2020.1774830

SEL as a Lever for Equity

https://casel.org/lever-for-equity/

SEL Webinars:

SEL and Arts Education: Navigating Uncertain Times, Preparing for the Future

Maurice J. Elias, Scott N. Edgar, Bob Morrison

https://www.artsednj.org/fostering-social-emotional-learning-in-and-through-the-arts/

SEL and Arts Education: Elevating Student Voice and Community

Jennifer Tsukayama, Sheikia Purple Haze Norris, Justin Dominic

https://www.artsednj.org/fostering-social-emotional-learning-in-and-through-the-arts/

Music Education and Social Emotional Learning

https://nafme.org/advocacy/quarterly-advocacy-webinars/social-emotional-learning/

Advocating for Music Education Utilizing Social-Emotional Learning

Scott Edgar and Bob Morrison

https://vimeo.com/426070325  

 

The preparation of the September Forward 2021 Guidance for Arts Education involved the review of hundreds of documents for national and state organizations as well as research from around the world. All of the documents reviewed for the creation of this report may be found in this google drive link below. The files are organized as follows:

 

NJ State Guidance

  • NJ State Guidance – Reports from various NJ based organizations

National Guidance

  • Center for Disease Control Guidance – All relevant CDC Guidance
  • National Federation of High School Associations Guidance for Music and Performing
  • National Arts Education Reports – All released guidance from National Arts Education groups organized by discipline
  • National Blueprints – Guidance from National Education Organizations

International Coalition of Performing Arts Aerosol Study

  • NFHS and CBDNA with University of Colorado/University of Maryland

Other States Reports and Guidance

  • State Reports – All available state reopening reports from across the nation
  • State Arts Education Guidance – All available state level guidance for arts education from across the nation

Arts Ed NJ Support

  • Advocacy Support – Tools and materials to support arts education supporters
  • News Releases – For the New Jersey Student Learning Standards in the Arts and the new Arts Education & Social and Emotional Learning Framework
  • Professional Development – New Jersey Professional Development for Arts Educators
  • Social and Emotional Learning Resources
  • Cultural Relevant Arts Education Resources

 

To stay up to date on the latest information sign up for the Arts Ed Now 2.0 app at:

https://artsednow.org

Or go to:

https://www.artsednj.org/september-forward/

September Ready Taskforce Members

Rose Acerra

Dennis Argul

Heather Barberi

Lisa Conklin

Richard Dammers

Vincent Delucia

Margaret El

Michele Elefante

Bari Erlichson

Jeremy Grunin

Porché Hardy

Dawn Hiltner

Priscilla Hopkins-Smith

Lewis Kelly

Rob Klimowski

Wendy Liscow

Carolyn Little

Matthew Lorenzetti

Cristina Marte

Anthony Mazzocchi

Danielle Miller

Bob Morrison

Patrick O’Keefe

Daniel Paolucci

Mary Reece

Kira Rizzuto

Michele Russo

Jeff Santoro

Dale Schmid

Lisa Vartanian

Elizabeth Zwierzynski

New Jersey PTA

New Jersey Music Administrators Association

Grunin Foundation

Art Educators of New Jersey

Rowan University

New Jersey School Boards Association

Art Administrators of New Jersey

Elefante Music

Arts Ed NJ

Grunin Foundation

New Jersey State Council on the Arts

New Jersey Education Association

Arts Ed NJ

New Jersey Marching Band Directors Association 

New Jersey Thespians

Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation

New Jersey Thespians

New Jersey Music Administrators Association

Dance New Jersey

Montclair State University

Speech and Theatre Association of New Jersey

Arts Ed NJ

New Jersey Music Educators Association

Speech and Theatre Association of New Jersey

New Jersey Principals and Supervisors

Arts Ed NJ

Young Audiences of New Jersey and Eastern Pennsylvania

New Jersey Music Educators Association

New Jersey Department of Education

New Jersey Music Educators Association

Dance New Jersey

 

Discipline Working Groups-Dance

Arvin Arjona

Simone Baechle

Laura De la Garza Noble

Trista DeFilippis

Emily Donahue

Karen Love

Cleo Mack

Cristina Marte*

Maribella Miller

Kandice Point-Du-Jour

Claudine Ranieri

Megan Reagan

Cassie Roberts Rossi

Melissa Sande

Marissa Stahl

Gina Statile

Nicole Zivkovic

Elizabeth Rose Zwierzynski*

Milburn Public Schools

Passaic Public Schools

Rutgers University

Hudson County Schools of Technology

Cranford Public Schools

Hillside Public Schools

Middlesex County Vocational Technical School

Dance New Jersey

Franklin Township Public Schools

South Orange-Maplewood Public Schools

Paramus Public Schools

Dance New Jersey

Passaic County Technical Institute

West Orange Public Schools

Gloucester County Institute of Technology

Garfield Public Schools

Queen City Academy Charter School,

Trenton Public Schools

 

Discipline Working Groups-Music

Dennis Argul

Katy Brodhead Cullen

Amy Burns

Laura Craig*

Richard Dammers

Nancy Dickinson

Rebecca Dugan

Mary Elder

Arvan Gopal

Libby Gopal

Casey Goryeb

Ron Heller*

Sam Hitchell

Cheryl Housten

Lynnel Jenkins

Jason Leshowitz

Shawna Longo

Matt Lorenzetti*

Lewis Kelly

Diana May

Anthony Mazzocchi

Kim Nimmo

Patrick O’Keefe

Jordan Peters

Joe Ramalho

Gabrielle Richa

Duane Smith

Bryan Stepneski

Ashlen Udell

Lisa Vartanian*

Adam Warshafsky*

Tom Weber

New Jersey Music Administrators Association

Newark Board of Education

Far Hills Country Day School in Far Hills

Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District

Rowan University

Washington Township Public Schools

Paramus Public Schools

Clifton Public School District

East Brunswick Public Schools

East Orange Public Schools

Rockaway Township Public Schools

Hopewell Valley Regional School District

Bayonne Public Schools

Montgomery Township School District

Hopewell Valley Regional School District

Clifton Public School District

Hopatcong Borough Schools

Linden Public Schools

West Orange Public Schools

Randolph Public Schools

Montclair State University

Paramus Public Schools

New Jersey Music Educators Association

Newark Board of Education

Newark Board of Education

Newark Board of Education

Newark Board of Education

Clifton Public School District

Bridgewater-Raritan School District

Paramus Public Schools

Montgomery Township School District

Westfield Public Schools

 

Discipline Working Groups-Theatre

Felicia Brown

Rob Klimowski

Julianna Krawiecki

Carolyn Little

David Marconi

Danielle Miller*

Nicole Oliver

Dan Paolucci*

Trenton Public Schools

Burlington County Institute of Technology

Princeton Public Schools

Toms River Regional Schools

Northern Valley Regional High School District

Hoboken Public Schools

Jersey City Public Schools

Jersey City Public Schools

 

Discipline Working Groups-Visual Arts

Lisa Conklin*

Margaret El*

Latasha Casterlow-Lalla

Jennifer Khoury

Andrea Lanchero

Susan Bivona

Aleksandra Drobik

Whitney Ehnert

Ellen Hargrove

Debbie Cella

Jennifer Johnson

Danielle Dagounis

Katrina Keeshan

Kiera Spadaro

Michael Fackelman

Daniel Bertelli

Monica Hill

Diana Fernandez

Veronica Barahona-Meza

Frank Perrone

Patricia Rowe

Donna Minervini

Kate Griffin

Julie Keating

Cat Gelchinsky

Vincent Colabela

Alexander Billups

Nancy Lucas-Miller

Art Educators of NJ/Somerville Public Schools

Art Administrators of NJ/Newark BOE

Passaic Public Schools

Bloomfield Public Schools

Paramus Public Schools

Bernards Township School District

Bernards Township School District

Montgomery Township School District

Haddon Township Public Schools

Glen Rock Public Schools

New Providence School District

School District of the Chathams

School District of the Chathams

School District of the Chathams

Bernards Township School District

Watchung Hills Regional High School

Newark Board of Education

Newark Board of Education

Newark Board of Education

Randolph Township Schools

Moorestown Township Public School District

Clifton Public School District

Watchung Hills Regional High School

Cresskill Public Schools

Cresskill Public Schools

Watchung Hills Regional High School

Newark Board of Education

Township of Union Public School District

 

Discipline Working Groups Arts & Culture Partners

Pamela Brant

Andrew Chiang

Allison Davis

Vincent Ector

Silvia F. Fantoni

Chiho Feindler

Samantha Giustiniani

Harrison Haney

Porché Hardy*

Kristina Hill

Jim Jack

Marshell Jones Kumahor

Wendy Liscow

Lauren Meehan

Amanda Potter

Michele Russo*

Noreen Scott Garrity

Alysia Souder

Shirley Thomas

Paul Whelihan

Symphony in C

Nai Ni Chen Dance Company

Arts Horizons

Arts for Kids

Newark Museum of Art

VH1 Save the Music

Count Basie Center for the Arts

Arts & Education Center

New Jersey State Council on the Arts

Appel Farm Arts & Music Campus

George Street

New Jersey Symphony Orchestra

Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation

Arts Ed Newark

Zimmerli Art Museum

Young Audiences of NJ & Eastern PA

Rutgers Camden Center for the Arts

Institute of Music for Children

Newark Museum of Art

Pushcart Players



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Contact Information

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16 Mount Bethel Road
Suite 202, Warren, NJ 07059
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(908) 542-9396